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Wednesday, July 23, 2008

Did Visa Ban Force Kibaki to Skip London Trip?

While Prime Minister Raila Odinga is currently on a high profile working tour of the United Kingdom at the invitation of his British counterpart Gordon Brown, questions are now being raised as to why President Kibaki opted to snub an official invitation of a foreign government to attend an exclusive investment conference in which leading European investors will be present to network with Kenyan businessmen and listen to the Kenyan delegation present the country' s case as 'open for business' and as the region's investment hub. Even more importantly, the Kenyans are expected to outline opportunities under the recently unveiled and ambitious Vision 2030 aimed at driving Kenya into the middle economy.

Despite belated explanations by government spokesman that that the President Kibaki had ‘mandated’ Raila to lead the delegation of seven cabinet ministers, it is emerging that the president was advised to opt out of the trip due to failure by the British government to recognize his government earlier this year and noting that to date no official recognition has been forthcoming.

Secondly, Kibaki’s advisors are of the opinion that the overzealous British press was waiting to ‘pounce on Kibaki like vultures’ given their government had announced they do not recognize him. Additionally, Kibaki’s handlers feared constant harassment from the media (in a similar manner Mugabe has been relentlessly pursued each time he travels out of Zimbabwe) may have ended up in a confrontation with his guards and consequently embarrassed the head of state.

Thirdly, the highly publicized visa bans on politicians whom were linked to post-election violence and also to individuals whom were accused of subverting democracy have also never been officially withdrawn. Precedents exist where even some Heads of State have been barred from entering the some Western countries. Sources reveal that foreign governments have so far not rescinded their decisions on visas because they are monitoring the GCG while awaiting the successful completion and implementation of the all important agenda 4 of the Koffi Anan peace talks.

Fourthly, the PM’s trip to Europe included a scheduled address the House of Commons, a privilege normally reserved to Heads of State and respected statesmen. It will be recalled that in February this year, two senior British ministers had given ministerial statements in the same House of Commons where they reiterated that the British Government have not recognised the Kenyan Government. Kibaki’s advisors feared that some House of Commons MPs may boycott his address to protest the way in which the disputed elections were conducted.

Although names have never been revealed, senior personalities in both PNU and ODM have been expressly barred from entering Europe and the US since 2006. With the passage of time, those who have been barred from leaving Kenya have slowly but surely been sieved from the rest. For instance Uhuru Kenyatta was recently in the US and is currently in London as part the PM’s entourage. Musalia Mudavadi is in Geneva leading Kenya’s delegation to the Universal Postal Union Congress whereby he is expected to preside over the official opening of conference. William Ruto was in Rome about two months ago to represent Kibaki at an UN-FAO food conference. Interestingly, all ODM pentagon members have been to Europe on official and personal visits in the last few months, while a good number of the 40-strong grand coalition cabinet and members of their families have never dared to set foot out of the country inspite of the relevance of their individual ministerial portfolios or business interests overseas.

When one takes a casual glance at Raila’s official itinerary, then considers the size of his entourage and that the main purpose of the trip was to attend a significant investment conference organized by the British government; all these seem to suggest that this was a far too important trip for the president to skip. Indeed, going by past experience where the first lady Lucy Kibaki has always been by the side of the president during all his international trips, this time she is prominently missing in action and curiously, the government took it upon itself to announce that Raila would be accompanied by his wife Ida Odinga.

The high profile visit coupled with Raila’s elaborate motorcade and British bodyguards, have already resulted into some major international news channels erroneously referring to Raila as the President of Kenya.

100 comments:

Anonymous said...

Phil, you are mad as always.
First let me tell you, I was at meeting with RT Hon Raila Odinga in London last night hosted by Kenya High commission. The meeting took place at Ocean room, Cumberland Hotel. It was organized by Kenya High commissioner John Muchemi for Raila and his team to meet Kenyans in Disapora. First, let me inform you this was the best Kenya gathering meeting I have ever been, it was very jovial, comical and very exciting. All the ministers spoke, starting with Wetangula, one by one till the last speaker the PM. We sang happy birthday to Mutula Kilonzo and Kiratu Murungi gave one of the best comical speech. When John Michuki spoke everyone went quiet but his speech was equally hilarious. Then, the last speaker Rt Hon Raila Odinga gave the keynote speech. He had nothing but praise for Mr Kibaki. He said the rivalry between him and Mr Kibaki was not ethnic but political but they have now reconciled and now work together as team, he went on to say when asked the question that Kenyatta and Jaramogi differences were also political and never ethnic.
He told the people present that Kibaki is not like Mugabe and Kenya is not Zimbabwe.

He also went on to tell us Kibaki had to be left behind to deal with Government matters.

Anonymous said...

by john msa
it is within every person's knowledge that kibaki stole the elections without any regard for our people. His conscience has made him to allow the people's president to attend the meeting. kibaki has no moral standing to continue to talk on behalf of Kenyans. we know it and he knows it that is why he doesnt handle the mau issue, the idps and many hidden issues.

Anonymous said...

eti Kibaki alikosa visa? ya kukaa kambaland hotel..sic..cumbersome 1 star hotel???

nway back to serious comment

now see how ironical these guys are..

chris a while ago posts on how we should avoid the yokes of white man, then phil here goes to tell us this 'Raila’s elaborate motorcade and British bodyguards, have already resulted into some major international news channels erroneously referring to Raila as the President of Kenya'..is this not praise for wazungu, an inferiority complex in fact..

shame shame shame....

but itrs good you have gone back to what you are good at, shower praises for kibaki and demonise all kiuks...keep up


Ivy

Anonymous said...

Why do those hard-core Kikuyu-haters on this blog not follow their leader, Raila Odinga, and reconcile like he does not only with Kibaki but with all the other Kikuyu leaders. What more can he do to convince you that your ongoing 'mourning of lost elections' is past. The present including Raila becoming a Kikuyu Elder has taken over since some time now - except by some dum-heads here. Open your eyes and read the writing on the wall. A writing done by Raila himself. But I guess you prefer to fill your life with your whining blablabla here while others are moving on leaving you behind stucked in your filth.

Anonymous said...

Regarding the classification of the Cumberland Hotel: It is a new 4-Star Hotel and rated as the latest world-class London Hotel, right in the heart of London on Oxford Street. It has been chosen since also the Kenya High Commission is nearby.

Anonymous said...

Ivy @ 2:00 Why don't you stick to the post. You are always so fast and your comments never make sense at all. Why dont you get your own name....You are becoming a nuisance now.

Phil i was wondering when the updates will come....Keep them coming in but keep in mind that the spoilt brats are nearby ready to rant and rave

Ivy Orichino

Anonymous said...

Chris is right;
Some of you are writing about stuff they dont know about. Here is where Raila was. CHATHAM HOUSE not an hotel


"Chatham House is independent and owes no allegiance to government or
to any political body. It does not hold opinions of its own; the views
expressed in this text are the responsibility of the speaker. This document
is issued on the understanding that if any extract is used, the speaker and
Chatham House should be credited, preferably with the date of the event.
This text was provided by the speaker and is not an exact transcript of the
speech as delivered".

Anonymous said...

let me get this straight-what you are saying Bw.Phil is that the British Govt officially recognises the ODM half of GCG but not the PNU half of GCG?hmmm....if that is the case why monitor at all the entire GCG pending the completion of agenda 4?ODM is part of that same government those foreign diplomats are monitoring isn't their endorsement of ODM a half-stamp of approval for GoK whether agenda 4 is completed or not?who's interests do the british have if not their own? they should lift kibaki's visa ban and officially recognise the ENTIRE GoK without contributing further to cracks already emerging in the GCG

Anonymous said...

raila was sent by Kibaki since his excelency was busy with more important issues than useless speeches in dingy hotels...

when Kibaki goes on official trips he stays in presidential suits not downtown new hotels with discounts for marketing purposes.

but as usual the raila worshippers will scratch, whin, praise and tell us how ida had high heels, how raila rode with a bunch of former colonial masters feeling important.

nway, kuna wanaopenda flashy looks and the hardworkers who control the economy of Kenya...


Ivy Orichino

Kwale said...

I could add no more to Anon 1:55.

Phil, you are barking mad just like Anon 1:55 put it. I was also at the meeting in London last night, and it was exactly as he/she put it there and much more. There were about 400-500 Kenyans in Diaspora present at the meeting. I only went to the meeting out of curiosity but I am glad I did.
Raila speech was very good, better than I expected. The fact he does not see Kibaki as his enemy unlike most of you here, made me think he is not that bad after all.
Even Balala speech was full of regrets about those who died needlessly and the minister for the Northern arid…was also very sober. Raila also told us his best friend is Mr Mwangi of Equity Bank who was present at the meeting and he is a Kikuyu! You see, Raila moved on long time ago and you are still here complaining about Kikuyus.

As for Raila security, phil has exaggerated like always for effect. The PM motorcade was that he was driven my Scotland Yard security and a police motor bike escort which is normality for all visiting dignitary.
As for PM, giving a speech at the house of common, again that’s Phil imaginations. He was due to meet Gordon Brown today at 9.00 am GMT at No 10 Downing Street.

Phil, you should have seen when President John Kufour of Ghana made an official state visit to UK in 2006. My, my, that’s what you call state visit. He was the VIP guest of her Majesty the Queen Elizabeth II and he stayed at Buckingham Palace throughout the whole visit. He was welcomed with 10 gun salute and a colourful aerial display from Queens’ regiment and a horse parade. The visit ended with a royal banquet with the president and Ghanaians living in the UK hosted by the Queen and Prince Charles.

Here is the Utube video clip;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gLulwV4yyHU

…and what a state banquet look like;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d3XaUqBmL24&feature=related

Anonymous said...

This is utter nonesense, why don't you conduct some simple research and you will see that Head's of States do not require visas for entry into foreign states, secondly it typically takes a resolution by the UN security council or the commonwealth to start effecting bans on heads of States, such decisions are publicly known, which is why individuals such as Mugabe cannot simply head to the UK on non-official business and even then when he passes through there on his way to New York for UN meetings he cannot be interfered with. Just recently Kibaki was in Rwanda representing the country at the East African Investment summit, now its Raila's turn to do the same overseas, did Raila suffer a visa ban in Rwanda and as a result Kibaki had to go there in his place?

Kwale said...

Note: Mr Mwangi of Equity Bank was travelling with the PM together with other top leading business people in Kenya. Also travelling with the PM and the delegations were the 10 permanent secretaries.

FYI:
HEAD OF STATES DO NOT REQUIRE A VISA TO TRAVEL TO OTHER COUNTRIES.

Anonymous said...

Iam wondering Kibaki was busy doing what?

Kwale seriously....Who brought the issue of kikuyu's in this post?

I rest my case and i give up

Ivy

Anonymous said...

THE MEETING WAS THE BEST YOU COULD EVER HAVE WANTED TO ATTEND. iT BROUGHT THE PRIDE OF KENYANS TO THE TOP. THE LEADERS HAVE SHOWN THAT THEY HAVE MOVED ON. ITS TIME TO LIVE FOR TOMMORROW AND FORGET THE PAST AS THE PRIME MINISTER SAID. LESSONS HAVE BEEN LEARNT AND AS AN ODM SUPPORTER I HAD T ASK MYSELF VERY SERIOUS QUESTIONS WHY THIS HONOURABLE MEMBERS WHO APPEARED AND SOUNDED VERY PARTRIOTIC WANTED TO SPOIL OUR BELOVED COUNTRY. AS THINGS ARE NOW IT LOOKS LIKE RECONCILLLIATION IS TAKING PLACE FROM THE TOP. WHEN YOU GET HON. MICHUKI PRAISING RAILA, THEN YOU HAVE TO SEE THE FACTS. ITS A SERIOUS EFFORT. WE ALL HAVE TO LOVE OUR COUNTRY AND HEAL AND MOVE ON FOR THE SAKE OF OUR CHILDREN. BY THE WAY WETANGULA SOUNDED VERY INTELLIGENT. HOW COMES HE IS PNU? JUST ASKING...AHAHAHAH...

Taabu said...

Kwale,
So that was you at the parking lot taking details of which vehicle carried who? Now I know and man you moved on kweli. If only you would live it and leave the kikuyu obsession aside for a single post. Otherwise nice seeing from without.

Taabu said...

Ivy,
Pole, you have been beaten hands down my dear. Can't beat serial and shameless imposter. You recall dubbists in colle they do it to the T including commas. Now mongrel has mutated to ORICHINO. Take heart and let him fill his heart.

Meanwhile HE SE Kibaki will be hosted by the Queen in 2013 and Kenyans in the diaspora and UK will have the opportunity to sample the royalties at the Palace.

Phil said...

You know, this post is not about which part of the world you are at or if you attended any of the RT Honourable's functions. Its not about where RAO is putting up while in UK.

It's all about unravelling why Kibaki opted out. So far - I cannot see anyone tangible challenge to my post which as you all well know, are carefully researched and investigated before being published!

There are many instances where Heads of State have been denied visas to visit other countries. eg. President Yahya Jammeh of Gambia has been denied visa to enter Saudi Arabia; Taiwan's president Chen Shui-bian was also denied visa to visit by a number of EU countries. Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was denied a visa to USA last year although he was due for a UN function in New York. You see my friends, there is plenty of examples, including right here in Kenya..where Kibaki can only travel to a select number of countries who had no qualms with the electoral theft - like UGANDA.

Ask yourself why Heads of State like Siad Barre, Mobutu, Charles Taylor and Mengistu have only found convenient asylum in Africa despite owning vast properties in Europe?? Also note prominent Nobel Laureate and former head of state like Mandela was until last month on the US list of terrorists, and people like Dalai Lama have been denied visits even to our country Kenya.

How low can we get? Someone here tries to equate an EAC visit by Kibaki to Kigali and an EU investment visit by Raila to London. This post is not about how Kibaki has travelled elsewhere before, but why he skipped this particular trip to UK.

The British government has not rescinded their ministerial statements where they publicly said they would not recognize Kibaki as head of state. Please note it was Alfred Mutua who told us the Gordon Brown had invited Kibaki and Raila. Is Mutua the new British Ambassador talking on behalf of his boss at No. 10 Downing Street?

Anonymous said...

Well said phil, Raila told the kenyans in diaspora that Kibaki was left behind to attend goverment duties. Is that not good for you?

Anonymous said...

anon 4.44 ati WETANGULA SOUNDED VERY INTELLIGENT.
do mind PNU are wnajingas

Anonymous said...

Ntimama Watch - Day 1

Clearly...I am not the only one who has noticed something very fishy going on with the press,politicians and civil society who have totally buried and ignored the fact that a whole minister last week admitted on National Television to wiping out between 600 and 1000 Kenyan citizens.

So today, I am starting a Ntimama Watch that will keep this issue alive until some action is taken on the minister either by parliament,the police, the President, PM or whoever. Parliament seemed so eager to take action former Finance Minister Amos Kimunya regarding the Grand Regency deal. Why the silence on this and the minister made a direct confession on National Television? If you did not see the confession, watch it here.


So this is Day 1 of Ntimama Watch. we urge the Police Commissioner Hussein Ali to take action on this minister. Such impunity is unacceptable in modern day Africa. This is not the first time William Ole Ntimama has been accused of being part of tribal cleansing or hatred. We demand action!

(Feel free to add Ntimama Watch to your blog and lets get some action)

kenya christian: http://kenyachristian.blogspot.com/2008/07/why-is-ntimama-confession-being-ignored.html

Kwale said...

Anon 4.44 … Yes, Michuki was the man of the day! He spoke poignantly about PM and surely if anyone had doubts about reconciliation efforts, Michuki proved them wrong.
He also made me laugh on several occasions, very comical character. I like his cleaning efforts for Nairobi river by the way.
Wetangula too was very funny and intelligent like you put there but I reserve the best comics to Kiratu Murungi.
Mutula Kilonzo, the birthday boy was in a very jovial mood too.

Very good night-out in London apart from that last crazy Luo woman who asked the PM about Kenyatta and Jaramogi Kikuyu/Luo rivalry. But the Prime Minister put her in place by telling her that Kenyatta and Jaramogi rivalry was not ethnic. I admired the PM on how he handled that question. He also said in 2002 he said 'kibaki Tosha' and he would say it again if needed.

Ivy said...

Taabu

Enyewe i have given up....Iam now like Barack Muluka "The dreamer of dreams....He/She can keep both of them.....
Now i understand why people fail exams.....As a blogger said people trying to shove out their achievements once they are cornered...so i am wondering if it was the Euro star or Eldoret express...Choose one

Ivy

Anonymous said...

Phil, you're a shame to the male species. you spend most of your time on innuendos and gossips, why don't you spend time working and getting a real job?

you gossip more than women

Njeri said...

Am tickled by some of the tribalistic comments that people make here. Indeed some Kenyans will never move on. Instead of focussing on healing and reconstruction like Raila is doing they engage in shallow politicking. Dear Kenyans let us give this this peace reconciliation a chance. We should be discussing more contentious issues like building the economy not some fancy motorcades.

Njeri wa Mburu.

Anonymous said...

Phil,

At the moment Kibaki wouldn't dare venture out to places he knows he will be asked questions. Don't we all know how good he is good in that area, given the frequent press conferences he holds?

After the embarassment of stealing elections and swearing himself for a second term, he would rather be part of the 'crowd' like the recent AU summit where he knew nobody would cast a stone since there are so many others like him.

I wonder how long he will continue doing this given that his situation back home is no better.

What joy is there in being a president hne you cannot dare venture in 6 out of 8 provinces?

SHAME!

kalamari said...

People lets face the truth. Kibaki alinyimwa visa. His passport has been stamped. Scoundrels cannot be allowed to travel all over. They are limited to visiting obscure countries, in Kibaki's case for the sole reason of selling Kenyan property. Nothing Good has ever come to Kenya because of his two or three trips abroad.

As far as motorcade, in the very unlikely event that Kibaki gets a face-saving-visa to the UK, he will be picked up at the airport by a taxi or a tuk-tuk…..escorted by one scooter. He will share a two bedroom flat with Mr. Nderitu in Trafalgar square.

Anonymous said...

[img]http://cache.daylife.com/imageserve/09ipgFRazFe5i/610x.jpg[/img]

5 hours ago: Britain's Prime Minister Gordon Brown (2nd R) and his wife Sarah (L) pose with Kenyan Prime Minister Raila Odinga (R) and his wife Ida Odinga (2nd L) at 10 Downing Street, in London, on July 23, 2008.

http://www.daylife.com/photo/09ipgFRazFe5i/Raila_Odinga

Anonymous said...

http://youtube.com/watch?v=J-FgKI98a7s

Chairman- KIBAKI
Vice UHURU or SAITOTI
Sec NYAMWEYA
Org KIUNJURI
Treas KANU Rep
Sports Sec KAMBA Rep

Anonymous said...

Kenya Press give a news black out-Just because RAO is over shining?


Kenya's PM says UK's Brown helped resolve crisis
Wed Jul 23, 2008 9:10am EDT Email | Print |Share| Reprints | Single Page| Recommend (0)[-] Text [+]
RELATED NEWS
Brown seeks to boost investment in Iraq
19 Jul 2008
Source: Reuters.com


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LONDON, July 23 (Reuters) - Kenyan Prime Minister Raila Odinga credited Britain's Gordon Brown on Wednesday with helping to start the process that resolved the east African country's bloody crisis after its presidential election last December.

The disputed election led to two months of violence in which about 1,500 people were killed and more than 300,000 made homeless.

Peace was restored with the formation of a coalition government between President Mwai Kibaki and Odinga's former opposition party.

"Unknown to many people, it was Prime Minister Gordon Brown who started up the process of negotiations through phone calls, one to me, the other to President Kibaki, during which he asked us to agree that he could play a role behind the scenes to broker negotiations," Odinga said, after talks with Brown at his Downing Street office in London.

"That phone call is what started it all off, ending up with the establishment of a panel of eminent persons led by the former U.N. Secretary-General Dr. Kofi Annan.

"That panel presided over the negotiations that ended up with the signing of the peace accord in our country, and the formation of a grand coalition government," he added.

Odinga, who will later attend a meeting designed to stimulate investment in Kenya, said his country needed trade and investment and was open for business.

"Kenya is not coming with a begging basket," he argued.

Brown said Kenya still faced challenges, such as tackling corruption, but added: "I am convinced by my talks today that Kenya's leaders have the will and determination to take all the steps necessary and I applaud their commitment." (Editing by Mariam Karouny)

Anonymous said...

Mugabe must be given safe exit: Kenya's Odinga
Tue Jul 22, 2008 11:34am EDT Email | Print |Share| Reprints | Single Page| Recommend (-)
RELATED NEWS

reuters.com


Zimbabwe rivals to start full talks on Thursday
6:18am EST
Mugabe opponents, government agree talks framework
21 Jul 2008
Zimbabwe opposition ready for talks: Odinga
20 Jul 2008
Zimbabwe’s Christian churches reject Mugabe victory
15 Jul 2008
Rice urges African nations to act on Zimbabwe
15 Jul 2008


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LONDON (Reuters) - Negotiations between the Zimbabwean opposition and ruling party should work towards ensuring a safe exit from office for President Robert Mugabe, Kenyan Prime Minister Raila Odinga said on Tuesday.

Odinga, one of Mugabe's most outspoken critics among African leaders, said the deal signed between Mugabe and opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai on Monday opened "a window of hope".

Speaking in London, he said Tsvangirai's Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) should enter negotiations knowing it has the upper hand, given it had won a first round of elections, which he said was the only poll accepted internationally.

"Therefore Mr Mugabe is not president, therefore they should not negotiate with Mr Mugabe from a position of weakness," Odinga said at an event at the Houses of Parliament, hosted by the London-based think-tank, the Royal Institute of International Affairs.

"Then be flexible enough to reach a compromise which will give Mr Mugabe a place to exit... For the sake of the people in Zimbabwe, we must give Mr Mugabe a safe exit," he added.

Both Mugabe and Tsvangirai have demanded to be recognized as Zimbabwe's rightful president. Tsvangirai refused to take part in the run-off election, citing attacks on his supporters. Mugabe was declared the victor.

Despite the recent crisis in Kenya, Odinga stressed the differences between Zimbabwe and his country -- in political, economic and military terms.

Kenya's own presidential election, in December 2007, was disputed and led to two months of violence in which about 1,500 people were killed and more than 300,000 made homeless. Peace was restored with the formation of a coalition government between President Mwai Kibaki and Odinga's former opposition party.

Odinga said Kenya did not provide a blueprint for the way forward in Zimbabwe "except on the need to open dialogue." Continued...

View article on single pagePrevious Page 1 | 2 Next Page-read more from reuters.com

Anonymous said...

@Anon 7.26

What you have just stated there is exactly what he (Raila) told Kenyans in Diaspora. It maybe breaking news to you but is stale to others.
You should have asked your man Phil to accompany Raila visit to UK, you wouldn't be checking on the web to know about these stories.

Anonymous said...

HERE IS RAILA SPEECH IN LONDON- THIS POST IS TRYING TO BE MALICIOUS - KIBAKI AND RAILA PROMISED TO WORK TOGETHER AND I STRONGLY BELIEVE THEY WILL- SO STOP YOUR FILTHY PROPAGANDA!!!!!



Transcript: The Rt Hon Raila Odinga
www.chathamhouse.org.uk 2
The Rt Hon Raila Odinga:

My Lords, Ladies and Gentlemen:
Thank you David, Lord Steel, for your generous introduction. It is a great honour and a pleasure to be here today – to the Palace of Westminster – the citadel of parliamentary democracy.

I admire the high quality of international research and influential ideas that
emanate from the Royal Institute of International Affairs and I thank them for inviting me to give this address.

I also wish to acknowledge Her Majesty’s Government for the steadfast support they gave to me personally and to the Kenyan people during the post-election
crises. I am also grateful for the moral and political support of many
parliamentarians and a great number of well-wishers in the United Kingdom.
Ahsante Sana!

I had a free hand in the choice of my theme. I decided to address you on the subject of leadership and democracy in Africa. I ought to say a word or two in explanation.

Africa and its leaders have been very much in the news, most notably Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe and President Omar Bashir of Sudan. And of course not forgetting us in Kenya.

Ladies and Gentlemen:
Africa is a continent of immense contrasts. It has great wealth but the majority of its people live in abject poverty. 300,000 people were killed in the Asian tsunami.

That many die in Africa every
month from poverty and disease away from the television cameras.
Thus the eyes of the world are averted from intolerable suffering.

Africans may be poor and getting poorer, but Africa is not poor. It has all the resources - human, natural and mineral - it needs for its development, but these have been exploited over the years to support other economies.

The plight of Africa compelled Tony Blair to remark:
“The state of Africa is a scar on the conscience of the world.”
To heal that requires moral and political leadership for today.
It is pointless for some to look back to yesterday’s colonial period.

Most of our people are too young to have known anything except our own independence.
It is generally acknowledged that leadership entails a vision inspiration, goals and strategies.
The term leadership conjures up an image of an exemplary figure.

Good leaders motivate or inspire their constituents.
Good leaders perform effectively and deliver for their citizens.
They ensure state and individual security; a functioning rule of law; education;health; and an economic framework conducive to trade, growth and prosperity.

They empower civil society and protect the natural environment.
They value personal freedoms and liberty.
Overall, good leaders unite the people and seek to be remembered for how they have improved the lives of many rather than the fortunes of the few.

Positive role models in Africa include above all Nelson Mandela who powerfully argued, and I quote:

"Africa is beyond bemoaning the past for its problems. The task of undoing that past is on the shoulders of African leaders themselves, with the support of
those willing to join in a continental renewal. We have a new generation of leaders who know that Africa must take responsibility for its own destiny."

There are other notable African role models such as Sir Seretse Khama of Botswana and Leopold Senghor of Senegal.
However, political leadership in Africa is also typified more by grotesque examples than by positive role models.

For example: His Excellency President for Life, Field Marshal Al Hadji Doctor Idi Amin Dada, VC, DSO, MC, CBE (Conqueror of the British Empire), the erratic and voluble President of Uganda.
For example: Mobutu Sese Seko, the kleptocratic President of Zaire (now DRC) who was once feted by the West. George Bush Senior praised his “personal courage and leadership in Africa”!

And a recent example: President Robert Mugabe after a very promising start descended into a brutal dictator. I quote his chilling words:
“We are not going to give up our country for a mere X on a ballot".
How can a ballpoint pen fight the gun?”
He declared that only God would dethrone him!

The African Union singularly failed in condemning the sham elections in Zimbabwe at the recent summit in Egypt.
They neither made specific demands on Mugabe nor condemned him
resoundingly.

That is not surprising.
You only have to look at the credentials of some of its leaders and know what binds most of them together.

Mugabe’s “victory” was accepted by the world’s longest serving President,Omar Bongo of Gabon, with a strange logic. “He was elected, he took an oath,
and he is with us, so he is President”.

It is vitally important that the people of African undergo an attitudinal change towards leadership that does not meet their expectations.

African leaders on their part must allow their political power to flow from the ballot boxes.
Only then can the continent attain transformative leadership which can sustain democracy and bring prosperity for their citizens.
Ladies and Gentlemen:

Some people have argued that the power-sharing we have established in Kenya provides a route map for Zimbabwe.
But the situation in Zimbabwe is not the same as in Kenya.
Our election itself was well conducted – even if the count was not. The run-off election in Zimbabwe was universally condemned as a sham and the result of
the first poll was never published except we were told that Mugabe lost.

Kenya’s economy is stable. Zimbabwe is in a state of collapse with hyperinflation. They are now in the process of introducing a Z$100 billion note that will barely cover the cost of a loaf of bread! Our military is independent.

In Zimbabwe they serve the ruling party. In Zimbabwe paramilitary organizations operate under various guises terrorizing the opposition and the people. We
have nothing like that in Kenya.
And of course Robert Mugabe is not Mwai Kibaki.

So Kenya does not provide a blueprint for Zimbabwe, except for the urgent need to open dialogue.

Yesterday’s initial talks are therefore welcome but only if they lead to a smooth exit for Mr Mugabe and the recognition of the votes of the people.But returning to main theme - democracy in Africa.

Democracy is all the rage in the world today. It is generally accepted that Iraq was bombed in the name of democracy. Thanks to the collapse of communism, democracy reigns supreme. Even President Medvedev of Russia is now a democrat.

African countries have embarked on a renewed quest for multi-party
democracy after settling on a one-party system post-independence.
In the past 4 years alone, there have been more than 50 democratic elections in Africa, and more than two-thirds of Sub-Saharan African nations live in freedom.


The rise of democracy in Africa cannot be solely due to external influences,especially pressure from the multilateral financial institutions and development
partners.

Africa is not an island unto itself and therefore cannot be insulated from the trends shaping our modern world. Democracy is in vogue.
The democratic movement in Africa is not an importation from outside, as it has
roots in African history.
However, democracy cannot take a uniform format in all the 53 countries of Africa.

It would have to take different forms in different countries to reflect national circumstances.
But, whatever the national variations, a genuine democracy would be judged by a number of essential universal characteristics.


These include the right of a people to choose freely the men and women who would govern them;
the primacy of the rule of law and the independence of the judiciary; freedom of expression and association; and transparency and accountability of government.
Where there is no accountability, there is really no democracy.
It remains the only bulwark against abuse of office.

And accountability can only be enforced if the citizens have the power to elect and dismiss governments. Democracy is about choice - choice of policies articulated by parties, and
choice of personalities.
This freedom of choice is meaningless without free elections.
Free elections in turn presuppose freedom of speech and of association.

Without freedom of association, viable political parties are untenable because in the absence of freedom of association it is difficult for people to come
together into political parties.
And none of these freedoms can be secured without the rule of law and an independent judiciary.

An independent and honest judiciary has an importance which cannot be overstated.
Democracy is not a magic wand with which to wave away the multitude of
Africa's problems.

No nation can be built without a strong leadership and no leadership can be strong that does not command the respect of its people.

Rooting out corruption, the scourge of Africa, is vital for a successful democracy. But that can only be achieved by a leadership with the strengthand moral authority which comes from personal integrity.

Democracy has an equally important role to play in the eradication of the evil of ethnicity, another scourge of Africa.

African nations are by definition multi-ethnic, multi-linguistic, multi-cultural and multi-religious.
Ethnicity is particularly dangerous to national unity when it becomes a powerful instrument exploited by politicians in their quest to hold on to power.

We are now introducing in Kenya entrenched state principles that proscribe ethnic politics.
Another way of averting this danger is to provide for power-sharing arrangements in the constitution in such a way that no ethnic group feels permanently excluded from government.

A pro-government Chinese newspaper said that post –election violence in Kenya was proof that Western-style democracy “isn’t suited to African conditions, but rather carries with it the root of disaster”. I could not disagree
more.

Naturally, elections are divisive in nature. It is one of the key functions of elections worldwide to expose the dividing lines
between competing political forces.
My political party, the Orange Democratic Movement, offered a real change in style and content of politics in Kenya.

We had clear proposals on decongestion of political power and decentralization of public services to reduce growing inequality in Kenya.
The post-election violence was election-related but not election-induced. Under the veneer of stability the state of our democracy was fragile:

over-concentration of power in a strong presidential system;
an Electoral Commission that lacked independence;

1. a first past the post electoral system where the winner takes all;

2. an unacceptable gap between the
very rich few and the many poor;

3. unresolved historical land disputes among some communities;

4. and growing ethnic and regional inequalities.

The Kenyan political landscape was already polarised well before and during the election campaign but became explosive when the official election results that were announced lacked credibility and international acceptance.

This provided the catalyst.
It ignited the ticking time bomb of ethnic distrust and hatred.
Kenya witnessed an orgy of violence where more than 1,500 people died –
sadly so many of them at the hands of the police – and 350,000 people
became internally displaced.

The world shockingly witnessed and experienced the hidden reality of modern day Kenya.

A far cry from the picture post card images of great beaches, majestic wildlife,
stunning sceneries and exotic communities.

Ladies and Gentlemen:
We have been to hell and back.
Never again in our history must we return to those times.
I pay special tribute to Dr Kofi Annan former Secretary General of the United Nations, President Kufuor of Ghana, President Kikwete of Tanzania, former President Mkapa and Lady Graca Machel who played unique roles in bringing
the crisis to an end.

The Agreement on the Principles of Partnership of the Coalition, what is now popularly known as the National Accord was duly signed on 8th February and the Grand Coalition Government was sworn in on 17th April 2008.


I commend President Kibaki for his leadership in accepting the NationalAccord.
But our unity was not based on words and goodwill alone.

The tragic events Kenya has recently lived through may have made us wiser as political leaders.
But President Kibaki and I are determined to provide firm leadership and build sustainable democratic institutions to enshrine justice, equity and
accountability.

We have embarked on institutional transformation in our society giving Kenyans what is long overdue - a new Constitution and far-reaching judicial
reforms.

The preamble to the Accord stated and I quote:
“With this agreement, we are stepping forward together, as political leaders, to overcome the current crises and to set the country on a new path.

As partners
in a coalition government, we commit ourselves to work together in good faith as true partners, through constant consultation and willingness to compromise.”
As part of the National Accord we have established several commissions of inquiry.

The Kriegler Commission is investigating specifically the conduct of the Electoral Commission of Kenya, with the disputed presidential election countas its main focus.

Let me add in passing that never again should the European Union and the Commonwealth agree to provide observers in elections in any which are not conducted by a genuinely independent electoral commission.

A second commission, the Waki Commission, is investigating the post-election violence.
And a third commission, yet to be constituted, is the Commission on Truth, Justice and Reconciliation. It will deal with past historical injustices and economic crimes.

Ladies and Gentlemen:
President Kibaki and I have bound ourselves to work together to create a conducive environment for national cohesion and economic prosperity.

We will break with the corrupt past and create a new inclusive Kenya.
We will lay the foundation of future growth through infrastructural development
and create opportunities for long-term employment.

Under our joint leadership President Kibaki and I are preparing to build institutions which will deliver the means to overcome long held grievances and
tackle inequality.

Our fundamental approach is trust in our people.
I hope my visit here will bring confidence to British investors and tourists to Kenya. Our nation is back on its feet.

Welcome! Karibu!
Democracy is a process not an event. As an African proverb says “tomorrow
belongs to the people who prepare for it today.” That is what we are doing.

Anonymous said...

VERY GOOD SPEECH- WAY TO GO PM RAILA- KENYANS STANDS BEHIND YOU FULLY.




Transcript: The Rt Hon Raila Odinga
www.chathamhouse.org.uk 2
The Rt Hon Raila Odinga:

My Lords, Ladies and Gentlemen:
Thank you David, Lord Steel, for your generous introduction. It is a great honour and a pleasure to be here today – to the Palace of Westminster – the citadel of parliamentary democracy.

I admire the high quality of international research and influential ideas that
emanate from the Royal Institute of International Affairs and I thank them for inviting me to give this address.

I also wish to acknowledge Her Majesty’s Government for the steadfast support they gave to me personally and to the Kenyan people during the post-election
crises. I am also grateful for the moral and political support of many
parliamentarians and a great number of well-wishers in the United Kingdom.
Ahsante Sana!

I had a free hand in the choice of my theme. I decided to address you on the subject of leadership and democracy in Africa. I ought to say a word or two in explanation.

Africa and its leaders have been very much in the news, most notably Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe and President Omar Bashir of Sudan. And of course not forgetting us in Kenya.

Ladies and Gentlemen:
Africa is a continent of immense contrasts. It has great wealth but the majority of its people live in abject poverty. 300,000 people were killed in the Asian tsunami.

That many die in Africa every
month from poverty and disease away from the television cameras.
Thus the eyes of the world are averted from intolerable suffering.

Africans may be poor and getting poorer, but Africa is not poor. It has all the resources - human, natural and mineral - it needs for its development, but these have been exploited over the years to support other economies.

The plight of Africa compelled Tony Blair to remark:
“The state of Africa is a scar on the conscience of the world.”
To heal that requires moral and political leadership for today.
It is pointless for some to look back to yesterday’s colonial period.

Most of our people are too young to have known anything except our own independence.
It is generally acknowledged that leadership entails a vision inspiration, goals and strategies.
The term leadership conjures up an image of an exemplary figure.

Good leaders motivate or inspire their constituents.
Good leaders perform effectively and deliver for their citizens.
They ensure state and individual security; a functioning rule of law; education;health; and an economic framework conducive to trade, growth and prosperity.

They empower civil society and protect the natural environment.
They value personal freedoms and liberty.
Overall, good leaders unite the people and seek to be remembered for how they have improved the lives of many rather than the fortunes of the few.

Positive role models in Africa include above all Nelson Mandela who powerfully argued, and I quote:

"Africa is beyond bemoaning the past for its problems. The task of undoing that past is on the shoulders of African leaders themselves, with the support of
those willing to join in a continental renewal. We have a new generation of leaders who know that Africa must take responsibility for its own destiny."

There are other notable African role models such as Sir Seretse Khama of Botswana and Leopold Senghor of Senegal.
However, political leadership in Africa is also typified more by grotesque examples than by positive role models.

For example: His Excellency President for Life, Field Marshal Al Hadji Doctor Idi Amin Dada, VC, DSO, MC, CBE (Conqueror of the British Empire), the erratic and voluble President of Uganda.
For example: Mobutu Sese Seko, the kleptocratic President of Zaire (now DRC) who was once feted by the West. George Bush Senior praised his “personal courage and leadership in Africa”!

And a recent example: President Robert Mugabe after a very promising start descended into a brutal dictator. I quote his chilling words:
“We are not going to give up our country for a mere X on a ballot".
How can a ballpoint pen fight the gun?”
He declared that only God would dethrone him!

The African Union singularly failed in condemning the sham elections in Zimbabwe at the recent summit in Egypt.
They neither made specific demands on Mugabe nor condemned him
resoundingly.

That is not surprising.
You only have to look at the credentials of some of its leaders and know what binds most of them together.

Mugabe’s “victory” was accepted by the world’s longest serving President,Omar Bongo of Gabon, with a strange logic. “He was elected, he took an oath,
and he is with us, so he is President”.

It is vitally important that the people of African undergo an attitudinal change towards leadership that does not meet their expectations.

African leaders on their part must allow their political power to flow from the ballot boxes.
Only then can the continent attain transformative leadership which can sustain democracy and bring prosperity for their citizens.
Ladies and Gentlemen:

Some people have argued that the power-sharing we have established in Kenya provides a route map for Zimbabwe.
But the situation in Zimbabwe is not the same as in Kenya.
Our election itself was well conducted – even if the count was not. The run-off election in Zimbabwe was universally condemned as a sham and the result of
the first poll was never published except we were told that Mugabe lost.

Kenya’s economy is stable. Zimbabwe is in a state of collapse with hyperinflation. They are now in the process of introducing a Z$100 billion note that will barely cover the cost of a loaf of bread! Our military is independent.

In Zimbabwe they serve the ruling party. In Zimbabwe paramilitary organizations operate under various guises terrorizing the opposition and the people. We
have nothing like that in Kenya.
And of course Robert Mugabe is not Mwai Kibaki.

So Kenya does not provide a blueprint for Zimbabwe, except for the urgent need to open dialogue.

Yesterday’s initial talks are therefore welcome but only if they lead to a smooth exit for Mr Mugabe and the recognition of the votes of the people.But returning to main theme - democracy in Africa.

Democracy is all the rage in the world today. It is generally accepted that Iraq was bombed in the name of democracy. Thanks to the collapse of communism, democracy reigns supreme. Even President Medvedev of Russia is now a democrat.

African countries have embarked on a renewed quest for multi-party
democracy after settling on a one-party system post-independence.
In the past 4 years alone, there have been more than 50 democratic elections in Africa, and more than two-thirds of Sub-Saharan African nations live in freedom.


The rise of democracy in Africa cannot be solely due to external influences,especially pressure from the multilateral financial institutions and development
partners.

Africa is not an island unto itself and therefore cannot be insulated from the trends shaping our modern world. Democracy is in vogue.
The democratic movement in Africa is not an importation from outside, as it has
roots in African history.
However, democracy cannot take a uniform format in all the 53 countries of Africa.

It would have to take different forms in different countries to reflect national circumstances.
But, whatever the national variations, a genuine democracy would be judged by a number of essential universal characteristics.


These include the right of a people to choose freely the men and women who would govern them;
the primacy of the rule of law and the independence of the judiciary; freedom of expression and association; and transparency and accountability of government.
Where there is no accountability, there is really no democracy.
It remains the only bulwark against abuse of office.

And accountability can only be enforced if the citizens have the power to elect and dismiss governments. Democracy is about choice - choice of policies articulated by parties, and
choice of personalities.
This freedom of choice is meaningless without free elections.
Free elections in turn presuppose freedom of speech and of association.

Without freedom of association, viable political parties are untenable because in the absence of freedom of association it is difficult for people to come
together into political parties.
And none of these freedoms can be secured without the rule of law and an independent judiciary.

An independent and honest judiciary has an importance which cannot be overstated.
Democracy is not a magic wand with which to wave away the multitude of
Africa's problems.

No nation can be built without a strong leadership and no leadership can be strong that does not command the respect of its people.

Rooting out corruption, the scourge of Africa, is vital for a successful democracy. But that can only be achieved by a leadership with the strengthand moral authority which comes from personal integrity.

Democracy has an equally important role to play in the eradication of the evil of ethnicity, another scourge of Africa.

African nations are by definition multi-ethnic, multi-linguistic, multi-cultural and multi-religious.
Ethnicity is particularly dangerous to national unity when it becomes a powerful instrument exploited by politicians in their quest to hold on to power.

We are now introducing in Kenya entrenched state principles that proscribe ethnic politics.
Another way of averting this danger is to provide for power-sharing arrangements in the constitution in such a way that no ethnic group feels permanently excluded from government.

A pro-government Chinese newspaper said that post –election violence in Kenya was proof that Western-style democracy “isn’t suited to African conditions, but rather carries with it the root of disaster”. I could not disagree
more.

Naturally, elections are divisive in nature. It is one of the key functions of elections worldwide to expose the dividing lines
between competing political forces.
My political party, the Orange Democratic Movement, offered a real change in style and content of politics in Kenya.

We had clear proposals on decongestion of political power and decentralization of public services to reduce growing inequality in Kenya.
The post-election violence was election-related but not election-induced. Under the veneer of stability the state of our democracy was fragile:

over-concentration of power in a strong presidential system;
an Electoral Commission that lacked independence;

1. a first past the post electoral system where the winner takes all;

2. an unacceptable gap between the
very rich few and the many poor;

3. unresolved historical land disputes among some communities;

4. and growing ethnic and regional inequalities.

The Kenyan political landscape was already polarised well before and during the election campaign but became explosive when the official election results that were announced lacked credibility and international acceptance.

This provided the catalyst.
It ignited the ticking time bomb of ethnic distrust and hatred.
Kenya witnessed an orgy of violence where more than 1,500 people died –
sadly so many of them at the hands of the police – and 350,000 people
became internally displaced.

The world shockingly witnessed and experienced the hidden reality of modern day Kenya.

A far cry from the picture post card images of great beaches, majestic wildlife,
stunning sceneries and exotic communities.

Ladies and Gentlemen:
We have been to hell and back.
Never again in our history must we return to those times.
I pay special tribute to Dr Kofi Annan former Secretary General of the United Nations, President Kufuor of Ghana, President Kikwete of Tanzania, former President Mkapa and Lady Graca Machel who played unique roles in bringing
the crisis to an end.

The Agreement on the Principles of Partnership of the Coalition, what is now popularly known as the National Accord was duly signed on 8th February and the Grand Coalition Government was sworn in on 17th April 2008.


I commend President Kibaki for his leadership in accepting the NationalAccord.
But our unity was not based on words and goodwill alone.

The tragic events Kenya has recently lived through may have made us wiser as political leaders.
But President Kibaki and I are determined to provide firm leadership and build sustainable democratic institutions to enshrine justice, equity and
accountability.

We have embarked on institutional transformation in our society giving Kenyans what is long overdue - a new Constitution and far-reaching judicial
reforms.

The preamble to the Accord stated and I quote:
“With this agreement, we are stepping forward together, as political leaders, to overcome the current crises and to set the country on a new path.

As partners
in a coalition government, we commit ourselves to work together in good faith as true partners, through constant consultation and willingness to compromise.”
As part of the National Accord we have established several commissions of inquiry.

The Kriegler Commission is investigating specifically the conduct of the Electoral Commission of Kenya, with the disputed presidential election countas its main focus.

Let me add in passing that never again should the European Union and the Commonwealth agree to provide observers in elections in any which are not conducted by a genuinely independent electoral commission.

A second commission, the Waki Commission, is investigating the post-election violence.
And a third commission, yet to be constituted, is the Commission on Truth, Justice and Reconciliation. It will deal with past historical injustices and economic crimes.

Ladies and Gentlemen:
President Kibaki and I have bound ourselves to work together to create a conducive environment for national cohesion and economic prosperity.

We will break with the corrupt past and create a new inclusive Kenya.
We will lay the foundation of future growth through infrastructural development
and create opportunities for long-term employment.

Under our joint leadership President Kibaki and I are preparing to build institutions which will deliver the means to overcome long held grievances and
tackle inequality.

Our fundamental approach is trust in our people.
I hope my visit here will bring confidence to British investors and tourists to Kenya. Our nation is back on its feet.

Welcome! Karibu!
Democracy is a process not an event. As an African proverb says “tomorrow
belongs to the people who prepare for it today.” That is what we are doing.

Anonymous said...

Sorry, news that Raila is on an official visit to UK HAS NOT made any headline or any news in UK. Not even in London papers or London televisions. And they are many local news outlets in London.

Anonymous said...

7:40pm

if all you listen to is kameme fm and inooro fm with kikuyu accents

and all that TV you watch is free air channels with pickpocket shows

we can understand why you havent heard or seen the news. yet!!!!

hehehehehehehehehehehehehehehe

Anonymous said...

Ivy Orichino

and that is why kenyans voted kibaki out!!misuse of our hard earned taxed money to carry all his family, relatives and dogs to expensive hotels while ordinary kenyans are suffering- shame on you boasting here- i guess your kikuyu idp's don't matter if they go hungry so long as kibaki stays in the most expensive hotels abroad?? shenzi wewe!!

Raila understands each dollar counts and he is not embarrassed in staying at a 4 star hotel why because he knows and understand that saving kenyans money is a priority!!!

Anonymous said...

anon7:40 AM

Where do you live?? in England?? I doubt- if you did then you would have heard Raila PM Kenya mentioned everywhere- so I guess you live in chorogochia like Rucy kibaki is quick to say- I advice you to stay there......

Anonymous said...

waaaaaooooow!! this is a fantastic speech- our PM Raila Odinga Has done Kenya Proud!!way to go PM !!!!!





Transcript: The Rt Hon Raila Odinga
www.chathamhouse.org.uk 2
The Rt Hon Raila Odinga:

My Lords, Ladies and Gentlemen:
Thank you David, Lord Steel, for your generous introduction. It is a great honour and a pleasure to be here today – to the Palace of Westminster – the citadel of parliamentary democracy.

I admire the high quality of international research and influential ideas that
emanate from the Royal Institute of International Affairs and I thank them for inviting me to give this address.

I also wish to acknowledge Her Majesty’s Government for the steadfast support they gave to me personally and to the Kenyan people during the post-election
crises. I am also grateful for the moral and political support of many
parliamentarians and a great number of well-wishers in the United Kingdom.
Ahsante Sana!

I had a free hand in the choice of my theme. I decided to address you on the subject of leadership and democracy in Africa. I ought to say a word or two in explanation.

Africa and its leaders have been very much in the news, most notably Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe and President Omar Bashir of Sudan. And of course not forgetting us in Kenya.

Ladies and Gentlemen:
Africa is a continent of immense contrasts. It has great wealth but the majority of its people live in abject poverty. 300,000 people were killed in the Asian tsunami.

That many die in Africa every
month from poverty and disease away from the television cameras.
Thus the eyes of the world are averted from intolerable suffering.

Africans may be poor and getting poorer, but Africa is not poor. It has all the resources - human, natural and mineral - it needs for its development, but these have been exploited over the years to support other economies.

The plight of Africa compelled Tony Blair to remark:
“The state of Africa is a scar on the conscience of the world.”
To heal that requires moral and political leadership for today.
It is pointless for some to look back to yesterday’s colonial period.

Most of our people are too young to have known anything except our own independence.
It is generally acknowledged that leadership entails a vision inspiration, goals and strategies.
The term leadership conjures up an image of an exemplary figure.

Good leaders motivate or inspire their constituents.
Good leaders perform effectively and deliver for their citizens.
They ensure state and individual security; a functioning rule of law; education;health; and an economic framework conducive to trade, growth and prosperity.

They empower civil society and protect the natural environment.
They value personal freedoms and liberty.
Overall, good leaders unite the people and seek to be remembered for how they have improved the lives of many rather than the fortunes of the few.

Positive role models in Africa include above all Nelson Mandela who powerfully argued, and I quote:

"Africa is beyond bemoaning the past for its problems. The task of undoing that past is on the shoulders of African leaders themselves, with the support of
those willing to join in a continental renewal. We have a new generation of leaders who know that Africa must take responsibility for its own destiny."

There are other notable African role models such as Sir Seretse Khama of Botswana and Leopold Senghor of Senegal.
However, political leadership in Africa is also typified more by grotesque examples than by positive role models.

For example: His Excellency President for Life, Field Marshal Al Hadji Doctor Idi Amin Dada, VC, DSO, MC, CBE (Conqueror of the British Empire), the erratic and voluble President of Uganda.
For example: Mobutu Sese Seko, the kleptocratic President of Zaire (now DRC) who was once feted by the West. George Bush Senior praised his “personal courage and leadership in Africa”!

And a recent example: President Robert Mugabe after a very promising start descended into a brutal dictator. I quote his chilling words:
“We are not going to give up our country for a mere X on a ballot".
How can a ballpoint pen fight the gun?”
He declared that only God would dethrone him!

The African Union singularly failed in condemning the sham elections in Zimbabwe at the recent summit in Egypt.
They neither made specific demands on Mugabe nor condemned him
resoundingly.

That is not surprising.
You only have to look at the credentials of some of its leaders and know what binds most of them together.

Mugabe’s “victory” was accepted by the world’s longest serving President,Omar Bongo of Gabon, with a strange logic. “He was elected, he took an oath,
and he is with us, so he is President”.

It is vitally important that the people of African undergo an attitudinal change towards leadership that does not meet their expectations.

African leaders on their part must allow their political power to flow from the ballot boxes.
Only then can the continent attain transformative leadership which can sustain democracy and bring prosperity for their citizens.
Ladies and Gentlemen:

Some people have argued that the power-sharing we have established in Kenya provides a route map for Zimbabwe.
But the situation in Zimbabwe is not the same as in Kenya.
Our election itself was well conducted – even if the count was not. The run-off election in Zimbabwe was universally condemned as a sham and the result of
the first poll was never published except we were told that Mugabe lost.

Kenya’s economy is stable. Zimbabwe is in a state of collapse with hyperinflation. They are now in the process of introducing a Z$100 billion note that will barely cover the cost of a loaf of bread! Our military is independent.

In Zimbabwe they serve the ruling party. In Zimbabwe paramilitary organizations operate under various guises terrorizing the opposition and the people. We
have nothing like that in Kenya.
And of course Robert Mugabe is not Mwai Kibaki.

So Kenya does not provide a blueprint for Zimbabwe, except for the urgent need to open dialogue.

Yesterday’s initial talks are therefore welcome but only if they lead to a smooth exit for Mr Mugabe and the recognition of the votes of the people.But returning to main theme - democracy in Africa.

Democracy is all the rage in the world today. It is generally accepted that Iraq was bombed in the name of democracy. Thanks to the collapse of communism, democracy reigns supreme. Even President Medvedev of Russia is now a democrat.

African countries have embarked on a renewed quest for multi-party
democracy after settling on a one-party system post-independence.
In the past 4 years alone, there have been more than 50 democratic elections in Africa, and more than two-thirds of Sub-Saharan African nations live in freedom.


The rise of democracy in Africa cannot be solely due to external influences,especially pressure from the multilateral financial institutions and development
partners.

Africa is not an island unto itself and therefore cannot be insulated from the trends shaping our modern world. Democracy is in vogue.
The democratic movement in Africa is not an importation from outside, as it has
roots in African history.
However, democracy cannot take a uniform format in all the 53 countries of Africa.

It would have to take different forms in different countries to reflect national circumstances.
But, whatever the national variations, a genuine democracy would be judged by a number of essential universal characteristics.


These include the right of a people to choose freely the men and women who would govern them;
the primacy of the rule of law and the independence of the judiciary; freedom of expression and association; and transparency and accountability of government.
Where there is no accountability, there is really no democracy.
It remains the only bulwark against abuse of office.

And accountability can only be enforced if the citizens have the power to elect and dismiss governments. Democracy is about choice - choice of policies articulated by parties, and
choice of personalities.
This freedom of choice is meaningless without free elections.
Free elections in turn presuppose freedom of speech and of association.

Without freedom of association, viable political parties are untenable because in the absence of freedom of association it is difficult for people to come
together into political parties.
And none of these freedoms can be secured without the rule of law and an independent judiciary.

An independent and honest judiciary has an importance which cannot be overstated.
Democracy is not a magic wand with which to wave away the multitude of
Africa's problems.

No nation can be built without a strong leadership and no leadership can be strong that does not command the respect of its people.

Rooting out corruption, the scourge of Africa, is vital for a successful democracy. But that can only be achieved by a leadership with the strengthand moral authority which comes from personal integrity.

Democracy has an equally important role to play in the eradication of the evil of ethnicity, another scourge of Africa.

African nations are by definition multi-ethnic, multi-linguistic, multi-cultural and multi-religious.
Ethnicity is particularly dangerous to national unity when it becomes a powerful instrument exploited by politicians in their quest to hold on to power.

We are now introducing in Kenya entrenched state principles that proscribe ethnic politics.
Another way of averting this danger is to provide for power-sharing arrangements in the constitution in such a way that no ethnic group feels permanently excluded from government.

A pro-government Chinese newspaper said that post –election violence in Kenya was proof that Western-style democracy “isn’t suited to African conditions, but rather carries with it the root of disaster”. I could not disagree
more.

Naturally, elections are divisive in nature. It is one of the key functions of elections worldwide to expose the dividing lines
between competing political forces.
My political party, the Orange Democratic Movement, offered a real change in style and content of politics in Kenya.

We had clear proposals on decongestion of political power and decentralization of public services to reduce growing inequality in Kenya.
The post-election violence was election-related but not election-induced. Under the veneer of stability the state of our democracy was fragile:

over-concentration of power in a strong presidential system;
an Electoral Commission that lacked independence;

1. a first past the post electoral system where the winner takes all;

2. an unacceptable gap between the
very rich few and the many poor;

3. unresolved historical land disputes among some communities;

4. and growing ethnic and regional inequalities.

The Kenyan political landscape was already polarised well before and during the election campaign but became explosive when the official election results that were announced lacked credibility and international acceptance.

This provided the catalyst.
It ignited the ticking time bomb of ethnic distrust and hatred.
Kenya witnessed an orgy of violence where more than 1,500 people died –
sadly so many of them at the hands of the police – and 350,000 people
became internally displaced.

The world shockingly witnessed and experienced the hidden reality of modern day Kenya.

A far cry from the picture post card images of great beaches, majestic wildlife,
stunning sceneries and exotic communities.

Ladies and Gentlemen:
We have been to hell and back.
Never again in our history must we return to those times.
I pay special tribute to Dr Kofi Annan former Secretary General of the United Nations, President Kufuor of Ghana, President Kikwete of Tanzania, former President Mkapa and Lady Graca Machel who played unique roles in bringing
the crisis to an end.

The Agreement on the Principles of Partnership of the Coalition, what is now popularly known as the National Accord was duly signed on 8th February and the Grand Coalition Government was sworn in on 17th April 2008.


I commend President Kibaki for his leadership in accepting the NationalAccord.
But our unity was not based on words and goodwill alone.

The tragic events Kenya has recently lived through may have made us wiser as political leaders.
But President Kibaki and I are determined to provide firm leadership and build sustainable democratic institutions to enshrine justice, equity and
accountability.

We have embarked on institutional transformation in our society giving Kenyans what is long overdue - a new Constitution and far-reaching judicial
reforms.

The preamble to the Accord stated and I quote:
“With this agreement, we are stepping forward together, as political leaders, to overcome the current crises and to set the country on a new path.

As partners
in a coalition government, we commit ourselves to work together in good faith as true partners, through constant consultation and willingness to compromise.”
As part of the National Accord we have established several commissions of inquiry.

The Kriegler Commission is investigating specifically the conduct of the Electoral Commission of Kenya, with the disputed presidential election countas its main focus.

Let me add in passing that never again should the European Union and the Commonwealth agree to provide observers in elections in any which are not conducted by a genuinely independent electoral commission.

A second commission, the Waki Commission, is investigating the post-election violence.
And a third commission, yet to be constituted, is the Commission on Truth, Justice and Reconciliation. It will deal with past historical injustices and economic crimes.

Ladies and Gentlemen:
President Kibaki and I have bound ourselves to work together to create a conducive environment for national cohesion and economic prosperity.

We will break with the corrupt past and create a new inclusive Kenya.
We will lay the foundation of future growth through infrastructural development
and create opportunities for long-term employment.

Under our joint leadership President Kibaki and I are preparing to build institutions which will deliver the means to overcome long held grievances and
tackle inequality.

Our fundamental approach is trust in our people.
I hope my visit here will bring confidence to British investors and tourists to Kenya. Our nation is back on its feet.

Welcome! Karibu!
Democracy is a process not an event. As an African proverb says “tomorrow
belongs to the people who prepare for it today.” That is what we are doing.

Anonymous said...

anon5:51 AM

kenyans watch day starts with
1. PNU MP's funding the mungiki genocide in Nakuru and Naivasha- human rights has named names in camera(we are waiting for those to be released to the public- although we already know who funded the mungiki.

2. Kenyans are watching on Anglo leasing? we already know some of the PNU thieving thugs mentioned

3. Transcentrury kenyans are already watching- they would like to know which kenyans own this shady corporation and how they come to own shares in the Rift Valley Railway line(Kenya Uganda railway) who did the deal for this individuals to get rich on other kenyans sweat??

4. Kenyans are already watching the Grand Regency saga- Kimunya the thieve and who was calling the shots?? who sold our hotel to the libyans

now should i say more?? or is it your kikuyu filthy sentiments to protect the killers, murderers and the thieves since they carry the kikuyu label??? mpumbavu wewe!! don't get me pissed off!!

Anonymous said...

Kalonzo Musyoka is fast disappearing from the political radar. Poor guy tries being relevant, but has predictably been used and dumped by the MKM.

He is yet to see their true colors .

Anonymous said...

Well without the two cent anti kyuk rubbish that is the hall mark of this site, lots of bloggers here would not know what to dowith their miserable lives. they are failures and dimwits whose only comfort in life is to nurse hatred aganist people they have never even met.

Wacha waendelee , otherwrise they will start committing suicide as they realise just what failures they are

Anonymous said...

To digress kidogo....

1. folks, why do you think central province is most affected by the wave of school riots?

2. What happened to the arms that were illegaly brought into the country during the skirmishes? Are they in some museum somewhere or will they be used at some point and by whom?

Hayo tu.

Anonymous said...

why do they call raila the president of kenya, thats kind of unfair

Anonymous said...

Raila has moved on and reconciled with mt kenya, even William Ruto has reconciled. what cant jaluo's also reconcile. Why is it that its always jaluo's complaining about kyuks? even kale's have stopped complaining. bure kabisa

Anonymous said...

Isn't he the president? Forget the one who is now snoozing at state house when there is a lot of business to take care of.

Raila and the ODM ministers are clearly showing them how the country should be run.

Kazi imeanza!

Anonymous said...

Anon @ 9:04,

Is it those voices in your head again? any proof that the jaluos are the only ones complaining? Did you expect kambas and merus to complain?

Once you table the proof even if it's true, don't you think the healing will take longer since the 'shoot to kill orders affected them more than anyone?

By the way, healing will start once somebody admits to having wronged us in the first place.

We are still in mourning and still searching for our relatives who we hear were drowned in the lake, so please don't open old wounds.

Anonymous said...

The majority of those who attended the Raila function in London were the aterere speaking people (Kyuks). They dont have a problem with Raila and Raila does not have problems with them.
And these guys are rich in UK, we heard they earn on an average £1.2 millions per an hour. Not as an individual but collective. Even the PM was stunned to hear that, he even promised them DUTY FREE TAX when they buy a property in Kenya and a dual nationality.
I was the few non-aterere speaking people in that room. All you could here is aterere....

Anonymous said...

9:16 AM
we heard they earn on an average £1.2 millions per an hour

WHAT CRAP IS THIS?? SHOW US THE PROOF WHERE THEY EARN THIS PER £1.2 HOUR COLLECTIVELY- POST FACTS AND WHICH COMPANY OR CORPORATION EARNS THIS OR PAYS THEM THIS?? POST FACTS- I'M A KENYAN LIVING IN LONDON WITH A VERY GOOD CONSULTING POSITION IN AN INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION WITH OFFICES IN MOST OF THE CONTINENTS-

POST THE FACTS OF EARNINGS HERE!!I DON'T ENDORSE SHADY TALKS OR LIES

Anonymous said...

CLAP !CLAP!!CLAP!!CLAP!!THIS IS A GOOD SPEECH PM RAILA ODINGA GOOD SPEECH.......

Transcript: The Rt Hon Raila Odinga
www.chathamhouse.org.uk 2
The Rt Hon Raila Odinga:

My Lords, Ladies and Gentlemen:
Thank you David, Lord Steel, for your generous introduction. It is a great honour and a pleasure to be here today – to the Palace of Westminster – the citadel of parliamentary democracy.

I admire the high quality of international research and influential ideas that
emanate from the Royal Institute of International Affairs and I thank them for inviting me to give this address.

I also wish to acknowledge Her Majesty’s Government for the steadfast support they gave to me personally and to the Kenyan people during the post-election
crises. I am also grateful for the moral and political support of many
parliamentarians and a great number of well-wishers in the United Kingdom.
Ahsante Sana!

I had a free hand in the choice of my theme. I decided to address you on the subject of leadership and democracy in Africa. I ought to say a word or two in explanation.

Africa and its leaders have been very much in the news, most notably Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe and President Omar Bashir of Sudan. And of course not forgetting us in Kenya.

Ladies and Gentlemen:
Africa is a continent of immense contrasts. It has great wealth but the majority of its people live in abject poverty. 300,000 people were killed in the Asian tsunami.

That many die in Africa every
month from poverty and disease away from the television cameras.
Thus the eyes of the world are averted from intolerable suffering.

Africans may be poor and getting poorer, but Africa is not poor. It has all the resources - human, natural and mineral - it needs for its development, but these have been exploited over the years to support other economies.

The plight of Africa compelled Tony Blair to remark:
“The state of Africa is a scar on the conscience of the world.”
To heal that requires moral and political leadership for today.
It is pointless for some to look back to yesterday’s colonial period.

Most of our people are too young to have known anything except our own independence.
It is generally acknowledged that leadership entails a vision inspiration, goals and strategies.
The term leadership conjures up an image of an exemplary figure.

Good leaders motivate or inspire their constituents.
Good leaders perform effectively and deliver for their citizens.
They ensure state and individual security; a functioning rule of law; education;health; and an economic framework conducive to trade, growth and prosperity.

They empower civil society and protect the natural environment.
They value personal freedoms and liberty.
Overall, good leaders unite the people and seek to be remembered for how they have improved the lives of many rather than the fortunes of the few.

Positive role models in Africa include above all Nelson Mandela who powerfully argued, and I quote:

"Africa is beyond bemoaning the past for its problems. The task of undoing that past is on the shoulders of African leaders themselves, with the support of
those willing to join in a continental renewal. We have a new generation of leaders who know that Africa must take responsibility for its own destiny."

There are other notable African role models such as Sir Seretse Khama of Botswana and Leopold Senghor of Senegal.
However, political leadership in Africa is also typified more by grotesque examples than by positive role models.

For example: His Excellency President for Life, Field Marshal Al Hadji Doctor Idi Amin Dada, VC, DSO, MC, CBE (Conqueror of the British Empire), the erratic and voluble President of Uganda.
For example: Mobutu Sese Seko, the kleptocratic President of Zaire (now DRC) who was once feted by the West. George Bush Senior praised his “personal courage and leadership in Africa”!

And a recent example: President Robert Mugabe after a very promising start descended into a brutal dictator. I quote his chilling words:
“We are not going to give up our country for a mere X on a ballot".
How can a ballpoint pen fight the gun?”
He declared that only God would dethrone him!

The African Union singularly failed in condemning the sham elections in Zimbabwe at the recent summit in Egypt.
They neither made specific demands on Mugabe nor condemned him
resoundingly.

That is not surprising.
You only have to look at the credentials of some of its leaders and know what binds most of them together.

Mugabe’s “victory” was accepted by the world’s longest serving President,Omar Bongo of Gabon, with a strange logic. “He was elected, he took an oath,
and he is with us, so he is President”.

It is vitally important that the people of African undergo an attitudinal change towards leadership that does not meet their expectations.

African leaders on their part must allow their political power to flow from the ballot boxes.
Only then can the continent attain transformative leadership which can sustain democracy and bring prosperity for their citizens.
Ladies and Gentlemen:

Some people have argued that the power-sharing we have established in Kenya provides a route map for Zimbabwe.
But the situation in Zimbabwe is not the same as in Kenya.
Our election itself was well conducted – even if the count was not. The run-off election in Zimbabwe was universally condemned as a sham and the result of
the first poll was never published except we were told that Mugabe lost.

Kenya’s economy is stable. Zimbabwe is in a state of collapse with hyperinflation. They are now in the process of introducing a Z$100 billion note that will barely cover the cost of a loaf of bread! Our military is independent.

In Zimbabwe they serve the ruling party. In Zimbabwe paramilitary organizations operate under various guises terrorizing the opposition and the people. We
have nothing like that in Kenya.
And of course Robert Mugabe is not Mwai Kibaki.

So Kenya does not provide a blueprint for Zimbabwe, except for the urgent need to open dialogue.

Yesterday’s initial talks are therefore welcome but only if they lead to a smooth exit for Mr Mugabe and the recognition of the votes of the people.But returning to main theme - democracy in Africa.

Democracy is all the rage in the world today. It is generally accepted that Iraq was bombed in the name of democracy. Thanks to the collapse of communism, democracy reigns supreme. Even President Medvedev of Russia is now a democrat.

African countries have embarked on a renewed quest for multi-party
democracy after settling on a one-party system post-independence.
In the past 4 years alone, there have been more than 50 democratic elections in Africa, and more than two-thirds of Sub-Saharan African nations live in freedom.


The rise of democracy in Africa cannot be solely due to external influences,especially pressure from the multilateral financial institutions and development
partners.

Africa is not an island unto itself and therefore cannot be insulated from the trends shaping our modern world. Democracy is in vogue.
The democratic movement in Africa is not an importation from outside, as it has
roots in African history.
However, democracy cannot take a uniform format in all the 53 countries of Africa.

It would have to take different forms in different countries to reflect national circumstances.
But, whatever the national variations, a genuine democracy would be judged by a number of essential universal characteristics.


These include the right of a people to choose freely the men and women who would govern them;
the primacy of the rule of law and the independence of the judiciary; freedom of expression and association; and transparency and accountability of government.
Where there is no accountability, there is really no democracy.
It remains the only bulwark against abuse of office.

And accountability can only be enforced if the citizens have the power to elect and dismiss governments. Democracy is about choice - choice of policies articulated by parties, and
choice of personalities.
This freedom of choice is meaningless without free elections.
Free elections in turn presuppose freedom of speech and of association.

Without freedom of association, viable political parties are untenable because in the absence of freedom of association it is difficult for people to come
together into political parties.
And none of these freedoms can be secured without the rule of law and an independent judiciary.

An independent and honest judiciary has an importance which cannot be overstated.
Democracy is not a magic wand with which to wave away the multitude of
Africa's problems.

No nation can be built without a strong leadership and no leadership can be strong that does not command the respect of its people.

Rooting out corruption, the scourge of Africa, is vital for a successful democracy. But that can only be achieved by a leadership with the strengthand moral authority which comes from personal integrity.

Democracy has an equally important role to play in the eradication of the evil of ethnicity, another scourge of Africa.

African nations are by definition multi-ethnic, multi-linguistic, multi-cultural and multi-religious.
Ethnicity is particularly dangerous to national unity when it becomes a powerful instrument exploited by politicians in their quest to hold on to power.

We are now introducing in Kenya entrenched state principles that proscribe ethnic politics.
Another way of averting this danger is to provide for power-sharing arrangements in the constitution in such a way that no ethnic group feels permanently excluded from government.

A pro-government Chinese newspaper said that post –election violence in Kenya was proof that Western-style democracy “isn’t suited to African conditions, but rather carries with it the root of disaster”. I could not disagree
more.

Naturally, elections are divisive in nature. It is one of the key functions of elections worldwide to expose the dividing lines
between competing political forces.
My political party, the Orange Democratic Movement, offered a real change in style and content of politics in Kenya.

We had clear proposals on decongestion of political power and decentralization of public services to reduce growing inequality in Kenya.
The post-election violence was election-related but not election-induced. Under the veneer of stability the state of our democracy was fragile:

over-concentration of power in a strong presidential system;
an Electoral Commission that lacked independence;

1. a first past the post electoral system where the winner takes all;

2. an unacceptable gap between the
very rich few and the many poor;

3. unresolved historical land disputes among some communities;

4. and growing ethnic and regional inequalities.

The Kenyan political landscape was already polarised well before and during the election campaign but became explosive when the official election results that were announced lacked credibility and international acceptance.

This provided the catalyst.
It ignited the ticking time bomb of ethnic distrust and hatred.
Kenya witnessed an orgy of violence where more than 1,500 people died –
sadly so many of them at the hands of the police – and 350,000 people
became internally displaced.

The world shockingly witnessed and experienced the hidden reality of modern day Kenya.

A far cry from the picture post card images of great beaches, majestic wildlife,
stunning sceneries and exotic communities.

Ladies and Gentlemen:
We have been to hell and back.
Never again in our history must we return to those times.
I pay special tribute to Dr Kofi Annan former Secretary General of the United Nations, President Kufuor of Ghana, President Kikwete of Tanzania, former President Mkapa and Lady Graca Machel who played unique roles in bringing
the crisis to an end.

The Agreement on the Principles of Partnership of the Coalition, what is now popularly known as the National Accord was duly signed on 8th February and the Grand Coalition Government was sworn in on 17th April 2008.


I commend President Kibaki for his leadership in accepting the NationalAccord.
But our unity was not based on words and goodwill alone.

The tragic events Kenya has recently lived through may have made us wiser as political leaders.
But President Kibaki and I are determined to provide firm leadership and build sustainable democratic institutions to enshrine justice, equity and
accountability.

We have embarked on institutional transformation in our society giving Kenyans what is long overdue - a new Constitution and far-reaching judicial
reforms.

The preamble to the Accord stated and I quote:
“With this agreement, we are stepping forward together, as political leaders, to overcome the current crises and to set the country on a new path.

As partners
in a coalition government, we commit ourselves to work together in good faith as true partners, through constant consultation and willingness to compromise.”
As part of the National Accord we have established several commissions of inquiry.

The Kriegler Commission is investigating specifically the conduct of the Electoral Commission of Kenya, with the disputed presidential election countas its main focus.

Let me add in passing that never again should the European Union and the Commonwealth agree to provide observers in elections in any which are not conducted by a genuinely independent electoral commission.

A second commission, the Waki Commission, is investigating the post-election violence.
And a third commission, yet to be constituted, is the Commission on Truth, Justice and Reconciliation. It will deal with past historical injustices and economic crimes.

Ladies and Gentlemen:
President Kibaki and I have bound ourselves to work together to create a conducive environment for national cohesion and economic prosperity.

We will break with the corrupt past and create a new inclusive Kenya.
We will lay the foundation of future growth through infrastructural development
and create opportunities for long-term employment.

Under our joint leadership President Kibaki and I are preparing to build institutions which will deliver the means to overcome long held grievances and
tackle inequality.

Our fundamental approach is trust in our people.
I hope my visit here will bring confidence to British investors and tourists to Kenya. Our nation is back on its feet.

Welcome! Karibu!
Democracy is a process not an event. As an African proverb says “tomorrow
belongs to the people who prepare for it today.” That is what we are doing.

Anonymous said...

@Anon 9:22,

I did not say that, even myself wonderded the same thing, but this came from the very last guy who spoke on the night. If you remember the mixed race guy who work with kenyans in diaspora - Europe.

kalamari said...

Can anybody produce a copy of the latest and most prominent Kibaki speech. I think we need to compare it with Raila's. Only then will we understand how outdated Kibaki really is.

That said, Kenyans must refuse to have speeches for dinner. Si you all remember how Kibaki cheated us in 2002.

Anonymous said...

anon9:30 AM
Thanks for the clarification- I actually took that speech as a joke-
Kenyans in the diaspora should talk facts- you see that comment will be followed of course anyone would like to know what business this guys are into that nets them average £1.2 millions per an hour it better not be the same business Livondo is doing in kenya(and across all borders) if so they are in for a rude shock and if this mbesha(pesa) has anything to do with the corruption in kenya?? like channeled to them via Anglo leasing, Transcentury, charterhouse, Nyaga brokers and others?? then they are in the dog house too.
showing off your money without showing the Tax man in England what tax you have remitted on it is also trouble-
I want to see what is behind the average £1.2 millions per an hour
disclosure......

Anonymous said...

anon10:16 AM

Go ask Alfred Mutua -I'm sure you will get the latest-
but to point out this is not a speech competition- I think by now we should all have an idea which direction we as kenyans want kenya to proceed- and since we are the voters - we have the power in our hands to change that- by following our elected leaders and what they say and mean- not by comparing speeches!!

Anonymous said...

9:16 AM
we heard they earn on an average £1.2 millions per an hour

This is the dumbest thing I have EVER read by far, forget that 6% mirage that was being sold to the "unknowing" Kenyan masses.

How the hell do they even arrive at this figure?

Anonymous said...

http://www.number10.gov.uk/output/Page16015.asp

PM praises Kenya progress
23 July 2008

Gordon Brown has praised the decision of the government and people of Kenya to "step back from the brink" and support a unity administration following disputed election results.

Speaking to journalists at a Downing Street press conference with Kenyan PM Raila Odinga, Mr Brown said the Kenyan people had "chosen to work together" and that the UK would play its part in helping the country rebuild. A business round-table was being hosted in London today to kick-start investment and development, he said.

The PM said:

"We welcome the commitment to power sharing, we welcome the strenuous efforts made by all sides to live up to the expectations of the Kenyan people and we will fulfil our promise to help with the rebuilding...I am convinced by my talks today that Kenya's leaders have the will and determination to take all the steps necessary and I applaud their commitment."

The UK and Kenya will also work together on a number of key issues, the PM said. These include combatting drugs trafficking operations, establishing a trade agreement in the Doha round of negotiations taking place this week in Geneva and building an East Africa stand-by brigade to help encourage stability in the region.

Mr Brown also said that the UK and Kenya would work to "uphold democracy" in Africa and called for an end to voilence against MDC supporters in Zimbabwe. Mr Odinga said that the Zimbabwean people had been "cheated of their will" following recent elections and that they deserved "better treatment".

Prime Minister Odinga also expressed his thanks to Gordon Brown and the UK for beginning the process of negotiation that ended in the founding of a national unity government in Kenya in April this year following a disputed election and unrest that claimed as many as 1,500 lives.

He said:

"Unknown to very many people, it was Prime Minister Gordon Brown who started off the process of negotiations through phone calls - one to me and the other one to President Kibaki during which he urged us to agree that he could play a role behind the scenes to broker negotiations. That phone call is what started it all off."

Mr Odinga said he wished to speak of a "new Kenya" that was appealing to the world for trade and investment to help rebuild its economy.

Anonymous said...

National News

http://kenyatimesonline.com/content.asp?catid=2&articleId=2865

Mungatana rails at Kibaki, Raila over deputy PMs
Updated on: Thursday, July 24, 2008
Story by: By Joseph Mambili
....................................................................................................................................................................................



Mungatana

Assistant minister for Medical Services Danson Mungatana yesterday hit out at the President Mwai Kibaki telling him to keep off from party politics and focus instead at fortifying his legacy.

Mungatana said it was time the youth and women took over the mantle of leadership since the current crop of leaders have failed to steer the country to prosperity.

He said Prime Minister Raila Odinga and President Mwai Kibaki failed to appoint women as Deputy Prime Ministers, opting for male politicians instead. He subsequently told the two that it was time for women and youth to lead the country.

“Prime Minister had the option of Charity Ngilu while President had the option of Martha Karua to appoint them as DPM for ODM and PNU, but they failed to do so instead appointing men,” said Mungatana. He also cited the likes of head of civil service Francis Muthaura and permanent secretary in the Office of PM Mohammed Isahakia respectively as old clique who should not be in the office.

Mungatana gave a strong assurance that Narc-Kenya would field women and youth to vie for top seats including presidential candidate in the 2012 general elections. He maintained that Karua would emerge as the winning presidential candidate during 2012 presidential election while he would be the Prime Minister.

Said he: “Karua will be the next President in the country and I will the Prime Minister.” The remark comes at a time when trouble was brewing in PNU camp after some affiliate parties including Narc-Kenya rebuffed Kibaki’s call for the strengthening of PNU as a party not a coalition of parties, which resulted to some officials in the coalition telling Narc-K to withdrew its membership from the coalition. On Nyamweya, the minister said he should not talk party matters.

....................................................................................................................................................................................

Anonymous said...

Raila visit to UK is not making any news AT ALL anywhere in UK.
The only headline news in London newspaper today both morning and evening is;

"Barack Obama will meet Tony Blair before Gordon Brown on his London visit this weekend. In what will be seen as a snub to the PM Gordon Brown, the US presidential candidate will have talks with Mr Blair, now the international Middle East envoy, about the region and climate change. Mr Obama will take questions alone outside no. 10 Downing Street".

This is the news in UK.

Anonymous said...

I am Anon 11.48, by the way Iam listening Kameme FM, kauyu ka muingi live in London and they also dont have any news of Raila visit to UK. so, I don't where Raila is making headlines news.

Anonymous said...

@Anon 9.22
It's not the earnings, its the collective average gross income per an hour. A point to note 19% of Kenyans in UK are self-employed and further 80% are in full-time employment according to kenya high commision in London. It's the business people who have pushed the average income to £1.2m per hr but I still don't that figure. The best person to give us the real facts is the Kenya High Commission in London. so, feel free to go online and ask them.

Anonymous said...

anon11:18 AM

Reported on BBC

Breakthrough in Zimbabwe
On Sunday 20 July Andrew Marr interviewed Raila Odinga, Kenyan Prime Minister

Kenya's Prime Minister Raila Odinga confirms the opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai is 'ready and willing' to talk to Robert Mugabe.

Raila Odinga
Raila Odinga, Kenyan Prime Minister

ANDREW MARR: Well I spoke to Mr Odinga just before we came on air and he revealed some important fresh information about the situation in Zimbabwe.

But first I asked him about Kenya.

Just six months after the disputed elections there and the violent riots which followed how was he able to form a coalition with his former political enemies?

RAILA ODINGA: Supporters who were fighting against each other because of the disputed elections. But that has now passed us because as you know we signed a peace accord that ended the hostilities. And we then moved on to form a grand coalition government.

So over the last three months we have tried to bring our supporters together, reconcile our society to work as one. And that's the reason why we are now sending the message out there that Kenya is, was down but is now up and moving.

ANDREW MARR: Now some people have said that this bold experiment in bringing everybody into government together cancels out the result of an election, an election that in your view you had won and is therefore in some sense not democratic.

RAILA ODINGA: Well you know there were three elections in one - the civic, the parliamentary and the presidential. The dispute was really on the presidential election results where we ourselves felt that we were cheated by the Electoral Commission. So we agreed to set aside the presidential election results but to form this coalition government.

So that we can be able to introduce these fundamental reforms that the new constitution, a land reform, the economic reforms, so that the country does not again experience a similar situation that we witnessed earlier this year.

ANDREW MARR: Right. You've been one of the few African leaders to call clearly for Robert Mugabe to go. There are reports circulating now of some new deal being done between the MDC possibly and Zanu PF with Mr Mugabe perhaps moving to one side or exiting. Can you tell us do you know anything about what's going on there?

RAILA ODINGA: Well yes, 'cause I myself have said that Robert Mugabe is really an embarrassment to the African continent. But we are presented with a fait accompli. That is an incumbent who lost an election and refused to move on, then went on to do an election where he was the only candidate.

Now I have talked to Morgan Tsvangirai and we have, and told him that his need to negotiate, I'm told that the parities have now agreed a framework for negotiations which will be signed I'm told this coming week. And I'm encouraging this kind of dialogue in the interests of the people of Mugab... of Zimbabwe. I'm told that these talks are going to take place in Pretoria chaired by President Mbeki but supervised by the African Union and the United Nations representatives.

This is all that we've been calling for. And I see that if that does happen then there's a prospect for giving Mr Mugabe a safe exit, our view is that an arrangement should only be made that will give Mr Mugabe a safe exit from power.

ANDREW MARR: So in your view it would be essential that Mr Mugabe was no longer president after these talks were concluded?

RAILA ODINGA: My view is that he can be allowed to retain some kind of ceremonial position, ceremonial presidency as he prepares to exit the scene. But I don't think that it would be right to give Mr Mugabe executive powers. Because he doesn't deserve it. He lost an election. And the people of Zimbabwe surely have spoken through their, the ballot.

ANDREW MARR: And you've spoken to Mr Tsvangirai as you were saying. What's his mood about this? Is he optimistic?

RAILA ODINGA: Yes. I spoke to him last night. He was in Harare and he told me that his team will be going to Pretoria for these preliminary talks and depending on how they progress, he is then ready and wiling to meet with Mr Mugabe out there in Pretoria.

ANDREW MARR: Well that's, that's a big breakthrough clearly. This has been a terrible period for Africa's image around the world. How much damage to do you think that the terrible scenes in Zimbabwe have done to the reputation of Africa as a place which can run countries successfully, you know, decent record of democracy and self government?

RAILA ODINGA: I think that the experience here in Zimbabwe shows that the transition in Africa from a single party or military dictatorships to truly democrat systems of governance is going to be much longer. We have here the old leadership which is still trying to cling to power.

So I think one still needs to be optimistic that this is just one of those retrogressive developments, but on a larger scale you can say that the movement for change in Africa is surging forward. And that even in Zimbabwe it is just in a short time we are going to see real change.

ANDREW MARR: And when you discuss all of this with David Miliband and Gordon Brown and other ministers in London what will you be wanting them to do in this situation? Carry on pressing for further sanctions or sit back for a moment and watch the situation develop in Zimbabwe?

RAILA ODINGA: I am going to say that first I'm going to thank them for this time that they are taking along with other members of the international community in calling for sanctions against Zimbabwe.

Unfortunately it was not passed in the UN. But I'm going to insist that the world, the rest of the world must still continue with sanctions against Zimbabwe until a proper settlement is found. I think this itself will be a kind of incentive for Mr Mugabe to negotiate.

ANDREW MARR: Finally Mr Odinga could I ask you about one other issue which is that the international criminal court is seeking an arrest warrant for the President of Sudan, Mr al-Bashir, over the dreadful events in Darfur. The African Union has taken a pretty dim view of this. What's your view?

RAILA ODINGA: So many lives have been lost in Darfur. And I think that it is necessary for the African Union to be much more proactive on this issue, to lead the way, so that the rest of the international community basically just supports the initiative of the African Union. I think that basically to try to exonerate people here and there or to apportion blame is not going to resolve the issue of Darfur.

ANDREW MARR: Well prime minister good luck for your trip to London and thank you very much indeed for joining us this morning.

RAILA ODINGA: Thank you very, very much and I really look forward to coming to London to say that Kenya's up and kicking and ready for investment.

Anonymous said...

anon 11:18
more news on PM Raila Reported

Wed Jul 23, 7:34 AM ET

LONDON (AFP) - Kenyan Prime Minister Raila Odinga insisted Wednesday his country was back in business, after talks in London on attracting investors back in the wake of post-election violence and political standoff.
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Odinga and a delegation of ministers are in London for an investment conference in which they will bid to woo British businessmen with the pledge that Kenya is once again open for business.

"We have come to the UK with one message and that is that Kenya after the crisis is once again up and kicking," Odinga told reporters after talks with British Prime Minister Gordon Brown.

At least 1,500 people were killed in the east African former British colony following violence which erupted after President Mwai Kibaki was declared winner over Odinga of a bitterly-contested poll last December.

The unrest ended with a power-sharing deal in which Kibaki kept his job and Odinga was named prime minister.

Despite the recent problems, Odinga insisted that the government was "strong" and was "determined to do away with the past".

"This is a new Kenya, a Kenya that is not coming with a begging basket. It is saying we want only two things -- trade and investment."

In a joint press conference at his Downing Street office, Brown also expressed confidence in the strength of the government.

"I believe that the spirit in the grand coalition government in Kenya is such that they are sending out a message to the whole world that investment should take place in Kenya," he said.

"This is a government that is determined to deal with the challenges and to move forward in a new chapter in Kenya's history".

Anonymous said...

anon 11:18
more reported news in London on PM Raila Odinga

Let Mugabe go smoothly, Kenyan PM urges
News image
Zimbabwe president Robert Mugabe should be allowed to step down from power without reprisals from the opposition, the prime minister of Kenya has urged.

Raila Odinga, addressing a Chatham House audience in the House of Commons, said he believed agreement for talks between Mr Mugabe and the opposition Movement for Democratic Change party represented a "new window of hope" for Zimbabwe.

But he called for a "smooth exit for Mugabe" despite describing the leader as one of the "relics of yesterday that still cling to power".

"For the sake of the people of Zimbabwe, we must give Mugabe a safe exit," he pressed.

Mr Odinga reaffirmed his stance as an outspoken critic of the African Union's position on Mr Mugabe, accusing it of having "singularly failed" to either criticise Zimbabwe or make demands.

That is "not surprising", he added, when you look at the credentials of some of those there.

Mr Odinga, leader of the Orange Democratic Movement (ODM) in Kenya, was appointed prime minister after narrowly losing a disputed presidential election runoff held on December 27th last year.

Post-election violence left at least 1,500 dead and only mediation talks chaired by former UN secretary general Kofi Annan persuaded incumbent president Mwai Kibaki to accept Mr Odinga's establishment in a newly created prime minister's office.

Mr Odinga, on a visit to Britain to encourage UK investors to return to his country, said it was not legitimate to compare his experience with that of Zimbabwe opposition figurehead Morgan Tsvangirai.

The disastrous state of Zimbabwe's economy, the lack of a link between the military and government in Kenya and its "well-conducted" elections mean "Kenya does not provide a blueprint for Zimbabwe", he insisted.

"We are dealing with the issues that took us to the precipice. What we've been through was probably a blessing in disguise," he finished.

"Tomorrow belongs to the people who prepare for it today. That is what we are doing in Kenya."

Mr Odinga remained optimistic about the state of democracy in Africa overall, however, pointing to places like Botswana and Senegal as examples of positive progress.

He described democracy as being "in vogue", a comment questioned by Chatham House associate fellow Daniel Balint-Kurti.

"To say that Africa as a whole is progressing towards democracy, personally I think that's questionable," he said.

"What's interesting is that he's standing up for Tsvangirai but he's not adopting a no compromise position. It's still quite a pro-Tsvangirai position but it's still in some respects quite moderate," he explained.

"It shows a large degree of pragmatism. The question is, will Zanu-PF be willing to relinquish power?"
© Adfero Ltd

Anonymous said...

is it possible to just provide the link only, yawa

Anonymous said...

anon 11:18

inthenews.co.uk
reported


World News Story
23 July 2008 20:23 BST
World at a glance
Wednesday, 23 Jul 2008 11:04

Zimbabwe president Robert Mugabe should be allowed to step down from power without reprisals from the opposition, the prime minister of Kenya has urged.

Raila Odinga, addressing a Chatham House audience in the House of Commons, said he believed agreement for talks between Mr Mugabe and the opposition Movement for Democratic Change party represented a "new window of hope" for Zimbabwe.

But he called for a "smooth exit for Mugabe" despite describing the leader as one of the "relics of yesterday that still cling to power".

"For the sake of the people of Zimbabwe, we must give Mugabe a safe exit," he pressed.


NOW CAN YOU STOP BITCHING THAT OUR KENYA MP RAILA ODINGA WAS NOT IN THE NEWS IN LONDON!! FACTS ARE HE WAS IN THE NEWS SINCE THE DAY HE ARRIVED IN ENGLAND- I THINK YOU LIVE IN THE SLUMS OR CHOROKOCHIO LIKE RUCY KIBAKI MENTIONED- GO EAT YOUR HEART OUT SUCKER- I PITY YOU IN YOUR DENIAL THAT PM ODINGA IS INDEED A FORCE TO RECKON WITH !!!

Anonymous said...

I thought this is an interesting article though not related to the post. This reserach shows Kenyans as being optimistic about the future. Interesting!

http://pewglobal.org/reports/pdf/257.pdf

Anonymous said...

anon12:21 PM
Sorry I was just tired of some individual bitching here and trying to show that PM's trip to England was irrelevant by them posting two comments here claiming that PM of kenya Raila Odinga was not in the news- :):) yawa awicho:)

Anonymous said...

anon11:26 AM
how can you when you are busy with the chorokochio kameme????
remove your head stack in the sand and maybe your ears will open up to facts- you can't wish Raila away- si the same PM Brown is the one you took a letter to accusing Raila of hate for other tribes?? ha!!ha!!! I'm sure that was one of the jokes both leaders shared- the kikuyu memo written by some kikuyu thugs in London:)

Anonymous said...

Well, we heard the BBC interview on sunday with Andrew Marr AM but that was last week. I want you to tell me now where in UK both BBC and all other news channels is reported that Raila is in London. And don't give me Reuters, reuters is not a UK news media.

I give you the UK television news channel;
BBC1
BBC London news
BBC Newsight
BBC Four News
ITV News
London Today/Tonight
Channel 4 news
More news
Sky news
and Euro news.
None of these and I mean NONE of them have reported any news on Raila visit To UK.
And how many newspapers, God knows how many but they still have not reported anything other than Obama visit to UK over the weekend.

I am not being horrible, iam just telling the facts.

Anonymous said...

the best place to watch Raila visit to Uk is OBE channel. It's a black African people living in UK channel.
They were present live at all Raila functions in UK.
You can watch that on cable or statelite televison.

@ Anon 2.27
It was the majority Kikuyus who were at Raila meeting last night @ cumberland hotel.

Anonymous said...

http://www.number10.gov.uk/output/Page1.asp

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/andrew_marr_show/7515948.stm

http://www.inthenews.co.uk/news/world/features/world-news-roundup/world-at-glance-$1233019.htm

http://www.viewlondon.co.uk/news/let-mugabe-go-smoothly-kenyan-pm-urges-18696332.html

http://www.newsdaily.com/news/london/

http://www.kenyalondonnews.co.uk/

Now lets as go International


http://www.turkishdailynews.com.tr/apdetailspage.php?id=af28e3480a56812d215682e6d7416231cd1ce22

:):):)

anon 12:32 I think you are a bitter person:) PM Raila Rules like it or not:)

Anonymous said...

anon 12:32
more news in places that matter -you sucker:)

http://www.fco.gov.uk/en/newsroom/latest-news/?view=Speech&id=4502158

Anonymous said...

None of what you have listed there is a UK news outlet media.
I give you the list of UK newspapers which British people read;

The Sun
The Star
The Mail
Daily Express
Guardian
Times
Telegraph
FT
London Evening Standard
Metro
Lite
London paper
and many more local papers.

Note: Guardian, Telegraph and sometimes the Times they have correspondent based in Nairobi.

Was raila in any of them? NO!

Anon 12.52, FCO stands for Foreign and commonwealth Organistion and its NOT a news channel or newspaper.

Bring on another one!!

Anonymous said...

anon12:40 PM

You are funny- I was there?? which kikuyu's?? what exactly are you trying to imply??the kikuyu's brought by Michemi? or which ones?? the ones showing of what they earn when we all know different since i know what some of them are into for business??
so what were all the other tribes?? nonentities??

excuse me- the kikuyus were not the majority at the function- they were the loud mouths there- spare us the lies!!!

Anonymous said...

For those scoffing that majority of those who went to listen to the PM were Kyuks....think again. Remember Raila went to central--and he was welcomed--just several months after he called them aduis and went ahead to preside over their cold-blooded killing. If I were you, I would not be scoffing. I would be very careful. That's all.

Anonymous said...

as far as i'm concerned the number10 Downing street paper is the most important one to appear in even Kibaki has never featured in it(pole sana) and now BBC London is the most important news channel for any leader to appear in Raila carried the day:)
and as for the rest of the local papers of no importance to the global politics who cares- PM Raila appeared in those papers that mattered-
don't equate him to those thugs that appeared in local papers handing a brown envelope to PM browns assistant in January- those are the papers that post stories of kikuyu thugs complaining about how kibaki stole elections in the dark:)
sema sasa!! no points- from you- just a bitter kikuyu not wanting to accept that Raila Tosha:)

http://www.number10.gov.uk/output/Page1.asp
http://www.number10.gov.uk/output/Page1.asp

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/andrew_marr_show/7515948.stm

http://www.fco.gov.uk/en/newsroom/latest-news/?view=Speech&id=4502158

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/?ibPage=2

this are the papers that matter not local cheap papers that post kikuyu's everyday being caught stealing and robberies -and deportations to back to kenya- i guess those are the newspapers you are used to reading looking for your friends and relatives right:)

Anonymous said...

anon1:07 PM
repeat again?? you mean the same Mungiki kikuyu's kibaki send to commit genocide in nakuru and naivasha??
and the same kikuyu police who were end to slaughter innocent kenyans in Kisumu??
exactly which kikuyu's are you referring to?? and who are you telling to be careful?? are you threatening us on here??

Anonymous said...

anon 12:57
International Herald Tribune(this is the Global edition of the Times )

http://www.iht.com/articles/reuters/2008/07/23/africa/OUKWD-UK-KENYA-BRITAIN-BROWN.php

Like i Mention PM Raila Odinga only appears in Newspapers that matter globally- give up your bitterness you will choke on your own spit:)

Anonymous said...

Colonel Gaddafi :

IS THIS THE GUY KIBAKI WANTS TO TAKE OVER KENYANS HERITAGE? GRAND REGENCY AND OUR OIL???

LOOK HOW HE BEHAVES- HE IS A MAD MAN



Colonel Gaddafi has launched a bizarre diplomatic assault on Switzerland — including closing Swiss businesses, arresting Swiss nationals and throwing diplomats out of Libya — after his son, Hannibal, was arrested for assaulting a member of staff at a Geneva hotel.

The European country's Foreign Ministry claims that Mr Gaddafi has launched a single-minded campaign against Swiss interests in general ever since Hannibal, 32, was detained on July 15.

It says that the Libyan Government was guilty of initiating "retaliatory measures" in place against Switzerland from two days after the arrest. Libya’s envoy in Switzerland has been recalled and Libyan authorities have suspended the issuing of visas to Swiss citizens.

Air links between Switzerland and Libya have been reduced, two Swiss nationals have been placed in police custody since Saturday, Swiss businesses in Libya have received closure orders, and Libya has threatened to cut its oil supplies.
Related Links

* Gaddafi visit to France is ‘kiss of death’

* Gaddafi seeks to pitch tent in Paris

* Libya claims missiles deal with Britain

As well as carrying out diplomatic reprisals, Mr Gaddafi appeared today to have organised vocal protests outside the Swiss embassy in Tripoli over what demonstrators, identified as his supporters, claimed was "mistreatment" of his son, a claim Switzerland has denied. Hannibal Gaddafi was released on police bail last week.

In a statement handed to the Swiss ambassador, the protesters described the arrest as an "odious crime" and demanded an apology.

The Swiss Foreign Ministry, however, said that Libya's diplomatic moves were a completely unsuitable response to a standard criminal investigation, and announced that a delegation had been sent to Tripoli today to convey the message.

"A diplomatic delegation left Bern for Tripoli on Wednesday to give explanations to the Libyan authorities," a statement said.

Micheline Calmy-Rey, Switzerland's Foreign Minister, spoke to her Libyan counterpart, Abderrahman Shalgan, by telephone yesterday and made a "firm protest", while stressing that she wished to avoid the issue from worsening, the ministry added.

It is not the first time that Hannibal Gaddafi has had a run-in with police in continental Europe. In 2005 he was investigated in Paris for assault after incidents at two hotels in the city.

He also gained notoriety for driving down the Champs Élysées at 87mph before being stopped by police.

Anonymous said...

here is Gaddafi's guards fighting Museveni guards. Not in Tripoli. But in Kampala (Musevenis' home ground). Wait for that day in Nyayo Stadium at a national event when Gaddafi will wake up and in a fit look at Kibaki in the eye and call him Pumbavu publicly in his face. And Kibaki will say "YES". Coz he cant do anything about it. He is on Gaddafi's payroll until death will learn the hard way what it means to be owned by a Muarabu.


http://www.monitor.co.ug/artman/publish/news/Gadaffi_Museveni_s_endless_guard_fights.shtml


News | March 21, 2008

Gadaffi, Museveni's endless guard fights

RODNEY MUHUMUZA & GRACE MATSIKO

KAMPALA

THE Presidential Guard Brigade and Col. Muammar Gadaffi’s security detail were involved in a string of supremacy clashes during every public event that the Libyan leader attended, it can now be revealed.

During the clashes, security officials on both sides just fell short of pulling guns on each other, but both presidents seemed to be aware of the goings-on between their security outfits.

Matters came to a head when, during the opening of the Gadaffi National Mosque on Wednesday, President Museveni was pinned against the wall as his men fought with the Libyans to control an entrance to the mosque.

For about two minutes, a shocked Mr Museveni looked on as the security officers exchanged blows and threw each other to the ground.

The ensuing melee caught some reporters and diplomats, and for a moment it was difficult to tell who was in charge.
Mr Museveni managed to enter, but it was minutes after Col. Gadaffi had made his entry.

Earlier, at Nakivubo War Memorial Stadium, where Col. Gadaffi was a chief celebrant at a function to commemorate the birth of Prophet Muhammad, his security detail and the PGB fought to determine who got close to the presidents.

The Ugandans and the Libyans disagreed on risk-assessment and type of guns to be carried, according to a PGB officer who was involved in the scuffles. The officer, who did not want to be named because of the sensitivity of his job, said the Libyans were control freaks.

At the stadium, as at the mosque, the Ugandans appeared to get the better of the Libyans, who spoke in Arabic and often used sign language to communicate.

Security and protocol officers, speaking on condition of anonymity because they are not authorised to talk to journalists, said Col. Gadaffi came with close to 200 security guards, most of them armed. From Sunday afternoon, when Col. Gadaffi arrived, there were early signs of the scuffles to come when PGB officers stopped some travelling Libyans from entering State House, causing a stampede at the entrance.
That stampede was to be replicated in at least three other places, often in full view of photographers desperate to take snap shots of the presidents.

PGB spokesman Edison Kwesiga said there was no fallout from the clashes, but failed to explain why Col. Gadaffi failed to attend the proposed unveiling of a war monument in Katonga, a ceremony that President Museveni had hoped his Libyan counterpart would honour.

Col. Gadaffi left on Thursday morning, around the time he had been expected to be at the Katonga event, prematurely ending a visit that most Ugandans will remember for the traffic disruption and the resultant jams.

News of Col. Gadaffi’s departure was broken to ministers and senior army officers who had already converged in Mpigi to attend the event, district officials said.

Col. Gadaffi, who in the past travelled with an all-female security guards called the Amazonian Guard, was in Uganda to close the Afro-Arab Youth Festival and open the Gadaffi National Mosque, his gift to the Muslims of Uganda.

But his men, who always surrounded him as human shields whenever he was in public view, were apparently untrusting of the PGB, and the attendant uneasiness often gave way to clashes.

Officials on both sides disagreed on who was supposed to stand at the podiums where the heads of state were speaking, or who should stand behind which president.

“The Libyans are sensitive about their president’s security, and it has been like that since Sunday [March 16] when they arrived,” said one protocol officer.

In some cases, as the Libyan officers struggled to take control of security during events, blows were almost exchanged as PGB officers shouted on top of their voices that the Libyans should back off.

The Libyans, though they spoke some English, preferred to reply in Arabic, deliberately confusing the Ugandans. To avoid a confrontation, it was agreed that the Ugandans and the Libyans deploy their security in equal numbers around their presidents. But that was before the mosque melee.

And there was more drama to come when, after opening the mosque, Col. Gadaffi travelled in one of the heavy duty Land Cruisers instead of his green limousine.

Six of his guards, acting as human shields, jumped on the Land Cruiser’s windows to block hundreds of people from having a clear view of the Libyan leader as his convoy left the complex.

Most countries, according to a knowledgeable source, offer not more than 10 guards for a visiting head of state. But Capt. Kwesiga said: “A country can forward a request that it is bringing in a certain number of security personnel. Once the number is agreed upon, they [can] come, so it cannot be that there must be a certain number.”

A 30-seater Libyan jet arrived at Entebbe International Airport on March 6 carrying an advance team comprising security officers and secretaries.

Some Libyan guards were flown in on an Antonov aircraft on Saturday and more touched down at 2.30pm on Sunday, the day of Col. Gadaffi’s arrival. Sources said that Col. Gadaffi came with a fleet of 30 vehicles, airlifted by Libyan military aircraft.

They included three green armour-plated presidential limousines, two high-tech vans fitted with electronic jamming devices, two mobile communication stations, a repeater station based at the airport, a mobile mini-hospital with five doctors, three Outside Broadcasting vans belonging to Jamahiriya Broadcasting Corporation, a state-run media agency, and heavy duty Land Cruisers for guards and aides.

On Monday the guards, equipped with Uganda maps and Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, took a test-drive through the city towards the Gayaza Road round-about and made a U-turn through the potholed Mulago Road before retreating to State House, Nakasero.

Similar drills were conducted in Entebbe and Munyonyo. Other sources claimed that Col. Gadaffi came with a double that confused the PGB and protocol personnel on arrival at Entebbe and the Commonwealth Resort in Munyonyo.

Although Daily Monitor could not independently verify the claims of Col. Gadaffi’s look-alike on the entourage, it is well known that high profile individuals adopt doubles to enhance their security.

Capt. Kwesiga insisted that the PGB and the Libyan counterparts worked well together. The PGB, he said, never showed signs of an inferiority complex.

“That is a personal observation. We worked together. Remember this is not the first time we are working together--we have worked together before,” he said.

“For one to say [that] President Gadaffi’s guards wanted to take over the airport and State House, do you know how many soldiers [that would take]?”

Col. Gadaffi’s foreign visits have mostly been controversial. During a visit to Nigeria in 2006, he threatened to return home after the Nigerian authorities refused to allow all his 200 guards from entering the country with arms.

“Rarely can a host have been so happy to see the back of a guest as President Sarkozy will be today when Muammar Gaddafi and his caravan of 400 followers finally leave Paris,” reported the UK’s The Times in an article published after the Libyan leader’s visit to France last year.

“For the French President and many Parisians, the five-day official visit by the Libyan leader has seemed endless.” The article, published on December 15, 2007, was titled “Adieu, Col Muammar Gadaffi, a tricky guest.”

Mr Isaac Magoola, a Kampala political scientist, claimed that Col. Gadaffi’s conduct is driven by huge resources, long stay in power and his philosophy.

“The huge resources at his disposal give him leverage over other African presidents…he who pays the piper calls the tune,” Mr Magoola said.

“His long stay in power has made him insensitive to other people…He is more successful in Africa because we are poor. Fidel Castro of Cuba would have been like Gadaffi but his country is poor.”

ADDITIONAL REPORTING BY JOSEPH MITI

Anonymous said...

THIS IS WHY THE VISA'S TO THE POLITICIANS THAT BOUGHT ARMS TO KILL INNOCENT KENYANS.



Poll Violence: Who took illegally imported guns?

Published on 19/07/2008

By Saturday Standard Team

Security chiefs are tight-lipped over where two containers of firearms smuggled into the country at the height of post-election violence could be.

Not even before the Justice Philip Waki judicial commission on post-election violence is any of them willing to spill the beans. They would also not talk about why there has been no mop-up of the weapons by the security forces given the deadly nature of the cargo.

When contacted about the matter by The Standard On Saturday, Police Spokesman Eric Kiraithe said the police took the investigation seriously and formed a team to investigate. He, however, ruled out the possibility of investigation being made public.

Army officers clear a barricaded road during the post-election violence. It was at this time that guns are said to have been illegally imported into the country. PHOTO: file
But what is, however, not secret is the militia group behind the smuggling of the arms from war-ravaged and lawless Somalia.

Not very secret, too, are the possible targets of the arms as the country spiralled into an orgy of bloodletting before the Kofi Annan talks bore fruit.

And a report by a United Nations agency on the movement of arms at the time confirms the frightening reports.

Beneath the veneer of the sad tale lies the story of Kenya headed to the dogs as thousands were killed, displaced and dispossessed. It points at how close the country was to civil war, even as the security forces were divided, with orders coming from a select class of politicians and top civil servants.

Top police officers familiar with the consignment concede — on the promise of confidential cover — that their efforts to track down the bearers of the illegal cache of arms have been slowed by powerful personalities in government.

The big question is not how the group managed to order the container-loads of firearms from Somalia, but why the security chiefs — who have taken the witness box before the Waki team — have not spoken of what could undermine national security.

Those who have appeared before the team include the Chief of General Staff, Gen Jeremiah Kianga, Police Commissioner Maj-Gen Hussein Ali, and the Director General of the National Security Intelligence Service Michael Gichangi, Administration Police Commandant Kinuthia Mbugua, and Internal Security Permanent Secretary Francis Kimemia.

The two packed containers were ferried through Isiolo to Nairobi. Police spokesman Kiraithe confirmed investigations were still on, but did not explain why six months later, those who imported the arms have not been arrested, the arms seized, and the veracity of the claims that powerful personalities had frustrated the tracking down of the illegal cache.

Secrecy

Kiraithe would only say the police chief took the investigation seriously and formed a team to investigate.

"The claims were taken very seriously by the force. This is a big thing and investigation is ongoing," he said.

A member of the investigating team revealed to The Standard on Saturday the hurdles on the path of investigation.

"People who were behind this thing do not want it to be exposed. They are not willing to meet us or to make it public in any manner."

The official said preliminary investigations had established that there was a shipment of such cargo during post-election period, but they were yet to know the current whereabouts.

The UN Monitoring Group, in a report submitted recently to the Security Council, said it detected a strange movement of firearms from Somalia into Kenya in the middle of the election violence early this year.

The UN reported as systematic the buying of arms from Somalia with some measure of impunity. The period the UN report refers to appear to coincide with the time the US Embassy in Nairobi revoked the visas of 10 MPs, among other prominent people.

The Embassy accused those it blacklisted in early February this year as either having been behind the violence — in which over 1,200 were killed and about 350,000 displaced — or standing in the way of a peace agreement at the time.

US Ambassador Michael Ranneberger said his country "decided to apply our travel restrictions on individuals who we believed to have participated in the instigation of violence, violation of human rights and breaking of democratic practices."

According to the UN group that monitors activities in Somalia, a consignment of guns was imported between February and mid-March, as the country stood on the brink of war.

A buyer the UN group identifies specifically as "a militia group in Kenya" was among the several underworld groups that ordered firearms into the country in the middle of the violence.

The militia group brought 12 AK-47s and six boxes of ammunition, eight pistols, four boxes of ammunition and six magazines.

The clients also needed four Belgium FAL guns, six boxes of ammunition and eight magazines.

But no explanation has come forward even from security chiefs who have taken the witness box at the Justice Waki Commission.

The UN report aside, interviews with illegal gun traders in the north of the country also confirmed a flurry of arms buying at the height of the violence, with most orders coming from Nairobi.

One dealer said ordinarily, he would have orders for "ordinary crimes" with criminals asking for one or two guns. Things changed in the middle of violence, with orders from Nairobi outstripping usual demand. A dealer who admitted getting orders, however, said his were cancelled after the violence stopped with the signing of the peace deal.

Anonymous said...

I'd rather deal with Gaddafi than with the UK and USA. At least the former is in Africa!

Anonymous said...

anon 1:16 pm. Payuka-payuka, whining, getting excited by small things. And the world passes you by. Then you fall back on the same old excuse--the Kikuyus stole your cow from 1963-2007, stole yur schools, brought you AIDs etc. Bure kabisa!
Go lie down and die.

Anonymous said...

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/7515998.stm

WATCH

Anonymous said...

Anon3:54 PM

educate yourself first before you post embarrassing post here-
take not of what business or you might call them hand out the USA gives and invests in kenya versis your kibaki darling Gaddaffi-
even your brown teethed central people are using some of the funding from the USA and recently your coffee farmers in nyeri got deals from starbucks coffee houses to grow them coffee a very good deal(American people going to drink loads of coffee grown by nyeri farmers

I guess lacking in education and facts is a sad thing- no wonder kenya is in the dog house - seeing the tribe which has been in place since 2002.

I suggest you go live in Libya- and lick gaddaffi's tosh!

Anonymous said...

anon4:22 PM
you said it yourself:) facts i'm glad you have them straight and in order- you need a medal for stating facts-

why don't all kikuyu's states facts like you- good points yes the kikuyu's did all that and more:):)
1.Kenyatta stole from his own people (Mau Mua) those are the IDP's you see around landless beginning other tribes to let them stay on their land which was acquired by funds given to them by the British to buy back farms from the white settlers who wanted to sell.

Go read the J.M story and why he was assassinated and killed like dog by his own tribesman Kenyatta.

2. aids?? kikuyu's are known to be the largest number that do prostitution kenya- when they do tribe is not an issue but anyone with the shillingi is welcome.


3.looting yes from kenyatta, to Kibaki who has always if you look at the kibaki history in government he has always been a looter, a thug and a thieve so what is new??(his bus boy kimunya was just caught red handed)
you are the one who needs to remove your head from the sand- jinga kabisa wewe.

Anonymous said...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Epypj5tUHsY&eurl=http://www.number10.gov.uk/output/Page16015.asp

PM Raila Odinga - I applaud your speech- you are a breath of fresh air for kenya.

Anonymous said...

Where was gadafi when we were almost burning the country to ashes , did he offer us even a spoon of water , im sure he was ready to supply kibs with alot of ammunation.

Anonymous said...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x58FoweKIGE&feature=related

watch -this is for those who still spread propaganda and tribal hate on here- kenyans have moved on suckers- wake up!!

Anonymous said...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i8-TBtiacAI&feature=related

The commissioner of police and all those goons in the police force that killed many innocent kenyans should watch this narrative music on what happened in kenya if indeed they have forgotten -seeing the way they are answering questions directed to them in the waki commission(all bull-shit answers)

they slaughtered, killed and murdered kenyans in cold blood!!

Anonymous said...

why is there so much hatred in Kumekucha???
other Kenyan blogs have moved on...

i welcome you all to www.kenyanlist.com where we have funny stories, healthy discussion from Kenyans of all walks.

lets Komesha the hatred that is in KUMEKUCHA

by john msa

Anonymous said...

Kisumu experiences renewed Railamania
Published in Standard Magazine

BY Harold Ayodo

A butcher who wrapped a quarter kilogramme of meat in a newspaper with the picture of Prime Minister Raila Odinga narrowly escaped death by lynching in Kisumu recently.

Irate residents of Manyatta bayed for the blood of the seasoned butcher who was only rescued by police.

"How could he wrap a quarter kilo of meat with bones using a newspaper with a colour picture of a national leader like Raila? It’s unheard of," says Oloo Otieno, a resident of Kondele.

Ouma’s harrowing experience has made butchers cautious when serving clients after he closed shop.

"Now we usually confirm that the old newspapers we use do not have pictures that may offend our customers," says a butcher.

Vendors of groundnuts at the Central Business District (CBD) also say they vet newspaper pages before using them to wrap the delicacy.


Matatus in Kisumu have pictures of Prime Minister in order to attract passengers . PHOTO BY James Keyie

Small-scale businessmen and women say the same applies to pictures of Illinois Senator and Democratic Party candidate Barack Obama.

It is for reasons such as this that the late Vice President Kijana Wamalwa coined the term Raila mania.

Residents say elevation of Raila to the second Premier of the country is no mean achievement considering the hardships he underwent fighting for expanded democratic space.

Bar patrons who have mastered the politics of Premiership usually get free rounds of beer from the people who listen to the tales.

Dwellers of the lakeside town even dismiss mainstream newspapers that do not bear his picture or story on the cover.

Vendors concur that selling a newspaper without either a front-page coloured picture of or a story about Raila in the region is similar to marketing pork in Saudi Arabia.

"Kuuza gazeti hapa bila maneno ya mzee ni ngumu," a vendor says. (Selling newspapers here that is not about the old man is difficult.)

Newspaper vendors reveal that they sold the highest number of copies ever when Raila and Obama toured Kisumu together on August 26, 2006.

A vendor says the front-page picture of Raila and Obama in the Sunday Standard waving to crowds in Kisumu sold out before 8am on August 27.

Some residents keep copies of newspapers that carried banner headlines when Raila made ‘landmark’ political statements like warning of a ‘political tsunami’ four years ago.

Mama Milka Akoth has newspapers with stories of Raila since he was arrested over the 1982 coup, upon his release, his election as Lang’ata MP in 1992 to elevation as Premier.

Weighty speeches

Akoth says she has kept the papers because there are times Raila speaks in parables and it requires time to unravel his speeches.

"Many did not understand what Raila meant when he warned of a political tsunami four years ago until the Government side lost the referendum," recalls Akoth.

The philosophical grandmother of six says the tsunami was not spent until it swept several Cabinet ministers and Vice President Moody Awori from office last year.

"Agwambo ndio mchuzi ya magazeti. Kama hayuko kumekauka," says Akoth. (Raila is the spice of newspapers and without his stories the papers are dry.)

Akoth is among many Kisumu residents who still have on the walls of their sitting rooms the posters Raila used to campaign for President in the last polls.

Many matatus have posted huge photos of Raila inset on a US dollar bill on the back windows of their vehicles to attract passengers.

Matatus and boats on Lake Victoria have pictures of Raila, Obama and former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan.

Witty cab operators have miniature flags of the United States to attract the many foreign journalists who troop to the ancestral home of the Illinois Senator in Siaya.

Mothers have named their babies after the Premier in the belief that they would follow in his footsteps.

It is the same reason why the Executive Prime Minister Hotel attracts several clients at the lakeside town.

Anonymous said...

Shame of Kenya’s politics
Published on 21/07/2008

In Kenya, whatever politicians say is taken as gospel truth, while experts’ views are dismissed.

Politicians long ago discovered that the louder they shout, the longer they remain relevant.

Their survival is largely dependent on how well they are seen to fight for the rights of ‘their people’.

Thus, the din from the 10 Rift Valley MPs over the intended eviction of their people from Mau Forest puts them in good books with the community — with the 2012 General Election in mind.

At a Press conference last week, they made the issue of the forest murkier, with their misplaced call to their people to stay put.

They demanded a negotiated solution before the eviction is undertaken.

Kipkelion MP Magerer Langat claimed that the forum chaired by Prime Minister Raila Odinga comprised of "busybodies and activists."

But when one of their comrades, Bureti MP Franklin Bett left the Press conference, they got impatient and jittery.

One MP asked, "Ano Franklin? Kakobei" (Where is Franklin?) Someone answered that he had disappeared.

One MP claimed colleagues were afraid of commenting on the issue, as they would be labelled ‘politically incorrect’.

The lawmakers read mischief in the notice requiring people living in the forest to move by the end of October.

According to the MPs, the resolutions passed under the watch of the PM were part of a grand plan to punish the Kalenjin community.

Quite naturally the issue of post-election violence cropped up, and they sang in unison that their community was being oppressed.

The leaders believe alternative land should be identified, with an abundance of social amenities — perhaps state-of-the-art schools, health facilities, golf courses and clubs, where the residents can jig and unwind after a hard day’s work.

However, the MPs’ penchant to confuse the noble issue of preserving the Mau resource with unrelated and farfetched intrigues spells disaster for the country.

How, pray, is the ecosystem related to the question of the youth arrested over post-election violence? Why can’t the politicians just play politics with the arrest of the youth without involving environmental issues?

UNEP, among other environmental organisations, has warned that the destruction of the forest poses a threat to the well-being of million of Kenyans, since the Mau is a catchment area for about 12 rivers.

After a layman’s explanation, the MPs feign ignorance of the adverse impact of the Mau deforestation on the Sondu Miriu power project in Nyando District.

It was sad to hear a national leader like National Heritage minister William Ntimama say, "Tulimaliza watu mia sita hapa." (We finished 600 people here.)

Many will recall the shock on the faces of Raila and Agriculture Minister William Ruto as these words were uttered.

The fear of many helpless Kenyans resident in Narok and other parts Maasailand but who are considered ‘foreigners’ is understandable.

The 400,000-hectare forest is in jeopardy now as it was 15 years ago, because of playing politics with the fragile ecosystem.

By settling the so-called minority communities such as the Ogiek and other landless communities some years back, the government set the stage for a confrontation.

Reports of senior government officials and well-connected politicians having grabbed chunks of the forest lands, rubs salt into the wound — which the Rift Valley MPs are gleefully capitalising on.

The media has also cashed in on the frenzy, with little or no space given to land and environmental experts. Unfortunately this is the sad tale of Kenyan politics.

Anonymous said...

Phil,

You are a typical luo. Do you really believe there is any odiero in uk who knows who rao is?!

Anonymous said...

That’s what Luos and Raila need and they will shut up! The security bodyguard motorcade, visits abroad and overzealous reporters following his every move. Luos are showmen people; they like to show off because they have nothing and so when they see something that will give them publicity they just cannot contain themselves. Thanks Kibaki for giving them that!

Kibaki is not a showman, he does not like publicity and that’s why he did not go to UK. How many times have you seen Kibaki going on public for the last 6 years? He likes to keep it cool. Let they excited cat go running!

Kimi Raikkonen said...

"Irate residents of Manyatta bayed for the blood of the seasoned butcher who was only rescued by police.

"How could he wrap a quarter kilo of meat with bones using a newspaper with a colour picture of a national leader like Raila? It’s unheard of," says Oloo Otieno, a resident of Kondele.

Ouma’s harrowing experience has made butchers cautious when serving clients after he closed shop."

This is the kind of idiotic fanaticism that spawned the personality cult of Hitler, Ceausescu, Obiang Nguema in EQ Guinea, Ferdinand Marcos in the Phillipines, Kim Il Sung in North Korea and other malevolent and destructive dictators in world history. EVEN BEFORE Raila is President with real authority, the personality cult is WELL AND TRULY under way!!
The Standard does Raila NO FAVORS WHATSOEVER in publishing the story. Instead, it merely reminds and then reinforces the view amongst sober and freedom loving Kenyans about just HOW CLOSE we were to becoming sheep, unquestioning and docile, OR ELSE. It is sort of like watching a Dracula movie for the first time as a child. The sense of horror is pulpable, but fortunately, you know it is not real and that you are safe. It feels the same way knowing how close Raila came to be President. We would now be required to wear Raila T-Shirts in public. The days when you looked over your shoulder before speaking ANYTHING political would have been back with a vengeance.
This throbbing fanaticism is also the decisive factor that informs the majority of Kenyans to NEVER ALLOW people like Raila and his screaming hordes of fanatics such as those who almost lynched the butcher, to ever rule Kenya. WE WILL NEVER ACCEPT FOR OUR FREEDOM TO BE MORTGAGED TO TRIBALIST FUNDAMENTALISTS. EVER.

Anonymous said...

anon 1:21 PM
Is it for fear or what that whenever a Luo speaks or acts the Okuyus dismisses them contemptuously. What is that the Luos have done to Okuyus that make them appear so cheap, backward, poor etc? If we kenyans are to reconcile I think Kiuks need first to reconcile their mindsets.
It is for the same reason when engaged in a talk with okuyu men and women and boys and girls included Mugabe, Gaddafi and Obama's opponent are the best pets
So why all the bitterness, can you leave Luos with their flossing and you mind your business?

Anonymous said...

We have village IDIOTS on this blog that are regulars;

KIMI
KWALE
VIKII

Mad men to the extreme. WASHENZI SANA, I think their wives do not get them enough that is why their faculties are so polluted with the tribal hatred and non-sense that they spew here.

Imagine, these are IDIOTS that live overseas and have been exposed to the western cultures and ways of life and yet reason like they never left their village dens.......IDIOTS.

Vikii said...

9.18, I will be an idiot for as long as I live. If refusing to be fooled is idiocy, then I want to be the biggest idiot in town.

I do not have a wife and so in your very noble desire to get to the bottom of my idiocy, leave out ladies. I do not have a wife and I am not getting one any time soon.

About the tribal hatred that "we spew here", you should start getting pused to living with it. If I have ever 'spewed' tribal hate here or even judged anybody based on their ethnicity, I want to do that for the rest of my life. I am not changing a bit.

About our exposure to Western cultures, who told you they teach people to be worshippers of men in those Western countries you keep talking about? Did you expect us to become little Raila Odinga cheerleaders which is the true measure of smartness in your small head?

Look here young fellow, your little rants about people being idiots is nothing new. You are not going to change anyone. We were told here last year that we argue the way we do because we went to Ndethia high school before getting those Tom Mboya, sorry Otieno, sorry Raila Odinga scholarships to 'Ohio state Uni'. That did not change us, your description of us as idiots wont either.

Finally, I live in Kitui and Kitui isn't West of anything.

Kimi Raikkonen said...

anon @ 9.18. If telling the truth about the nakedness of your emperor, the Grand Sibuor of Bondo and conqueror of all the "fises" and all the crocodiles of Lake Victoria is village idiocy, then so be it. I am very proud to be an alert village idiot who has his antennae permanently tuned to the right frequency, the one that can smell the overwhelming pong of dictators and megalomaniacs like the Sibuor from 500kms away.
Secondly, i live in Kenya and have no desire whatsoever to live abroad, what for? I am very comfortable in Kenya thankyou, now that i am certain that your Sibuor will never enter the State House.
Finally, what is western culture to you? Is it the fact that you can speak English and call people village idiots, as you do? I assume you wear underpants, don't you? Is that not Western cultural influence? Why don't you convincingly demonstrate your resistance to Western cultural influence by setting the example and discarding the underpants and trousers and wearing a loin cloth that allows air circulation and free movement for your "goods"?

Kwale said...

Anon 9.18

It takes a village idiot to notice another. Calling me an idiot would never worry me a bit. I come from a village and am proud of it, that's why I use my village name.
I am very comfortable of whom I am and if not worshipping Raila makes me an Idiot, so let be.

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