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Tuesday, November 17, 2009

What I have against a new constitution

Guest post by Lucas Mboya

For some reason. We, Kenyans have believed...fallen for the hype that a new constitution is the panacea for the problems bedeviling our nation.

Much as I can see the need for change and a re-examination of our constitutional dispensation, I have a certain unease with a new constitution and the promises it offers. I do think that our real problems are far more related to the loss or erosion of our values than to poor legislation and outdated laws.

There is an inherent and very real danger about the way that we are approaching this issue.

African and indeed our traditional values, honesty, sincerity, hard work, generosity and more have been under attack by the advent of capitalism for the last 50 odd years. Constitutions worldwide have been adopted as the best way to ensure the proper functioning of a nation and or republic and the equitable distribution of resources as well as the inalienable freedoms of all people, the right to create wealth and many other checks and balances in a free society.

But try as I might I do not see how better legislation will improve our values. Values can only be instilled. They cannot be legislated. Legislation may be there to guard our collective values as a nation and can be improved and moulded over time to adapt with the fast changing pace of life....but can never be a substitute for an inherently good value system.

Japan is a wealthy country and one of the most ancient civilisations on earth with what would undoubtedly be one of the most diversified and vibrant economies on earth. We associate this country with good governance and all that comes with it. But I want to point out that despite laws being in place for the detection, and effective prosecution of crime and more so in this vein corruption, those implicated in the same often choose to take their lives.

This stems from a deep seated sense of justice in society ,such that one who has gone against the ‘moral code’ even in a moment of weakness finds more ‘honour’ in self inflicted death than the indignity of a public trial. I use the example of Japan because it also has in its constitution a official dynasty, in fact the very one that unchecked, 50 years ago, led to their involvement in the second world war and their subsequent ‘punishment’ by the USA being the only country to date to have seen the devastation of atomic bombs.

The point I am making is that it is very dangerous for us to put more reliance on a constitution, than on our own moral and ethical codes. Why limit ourselves to what is written in law. Shouldn’t we have in all of us our own ‘law’ that has a higher bearing on how we live than a written code?

What did Jesus tell the Pharisees when they accused his disciples of ‘working’ by ‘harvesting’ on the Sabbath day when they ate grains of wheat from the fields as they walked. Laws are made for man not man for laws. Let the overriding law be that in our own values rather than a constitution. It’s safer that way. A constitution or law should never be superior to your own value system. They should work in tandem to create a cohesive society. But your own values come first.

More so. In trying to find the ‘perfect’ legislative environment we run the greatest danger of alienating ourselves community from community, region from region than ever before.

Comments attributed to a number of Mp’s recently show what a deep seated problem we have. Some from both Rift Valley and Central province (not limited to) have openly said the next president should be from their communities/regions. With what has so recently put us at each other’s throats and a new constitution in the offering which advocates albeit in a ‘sober’ tone, the much discredited ‘majimbo’ system, are we not as Kenyans putting the cart before the horse?

Doubtless some will argue that a new constitution guarantees the equitable distribution of resources so it’s a prerequisite to the next election but who and what guarantees our morality? Laws have been broken before and will again.

Additionally we have complained that the current coalition is bloated and a drain on public resources. Pray what then is this new Constitution? Have we honestly looked at how multi layered it is and considered the cost of implementation of the required changes to our governance. More important to me though, is that while our priority right now should be how we can become more cohesive as a nation and rediscover our sense of patriotism from which possibly the seeds of a better value system may be sown, we are busy discussing a document that will undoubtedly divide us more along ethnic and community lines than ever before.


While I agree that changes and reform are necessary I would much rather an incremental change (amendments) to our current constitution that would allow us to go to an election as a unified nation and continue with the process of constitutional reform and or change after that point. Not to mention the fact that a referendum is still an option that would put more strain on our national psyche than we can now bear.

We have yet to identify and try the masterminds of the post election violence which will open up old wounds, the TJRC is supposedly underway, more and older wounds, a referendum possible, new constitution, then an election in 3 years time. Isn’t this too much to bite, chew and swallow at one go considering that in 2012 most of these will still be underway?

Rather than try to enter a long treatise for which in neither qualified nor inclined. I urge my fellow Kenyans, citizens to examine, not the new constitution but our own society and ask whether legislation can bring about or indeed is the appropriate tool, to bring us to the point of a new moral and ethical awakening which is the only sure way our guaranteeing the future of this nation.

As for me my view is that this effort is too little too late. I do not think it is the answer to our problems.

All things considered. I respect the fact that many will disagree with my position. Time will tell.

The writer of this post, Lucas Mboya is the son of the late Tom Mboya.

54 comments:

Anonymous said...

At least a post i agree with wholly. I have always asked this....we have a very good set of laws, but we have failed to obey them, hence the impunity we see all over. A new constitution is basically a new or modified set of laws. What guarantee is there that we will obey these new ones? Just who is it that is at the forefront in the constitution making? Isn't it the same crowd we have been yearning to kick out? So in the end we will have a new constitution, but the same people to implement...

JEFF

Mama said...

Oh wow! Amen is all I have to say.

Moses said...

I doubt this draft constitution will go through

Ken said...

This is the most intelligent post I have come along in Kumekucha in a long long long time. Thanks Lucas, maybe you can take over this blog from those idiots who think bashing this tribe and that tribe and glorifying useless leaders will add plates of ugali to their table.

I fully agree with your sentiments Lucas.

Anonymous said...

we need more guest writers instead of the usual crap that eventually goes tribal

Anonymous said...

A new constitution may not in itself be the answer, but at least when it sets clear checks and balances, guarantees freedom of religion, speech and association, provides checks and balances and returns power to the governed, then I think it can create the right environment for us to lay down values and systems that work. The constitution is not an end in itself, but a means to an end. It is like tarmacking a road through a village. You can either decide to herd your goats on it....or you can use it to transport your farm produce to the market. But the presence of the tarmacked road will make the people it serves want to maximize and use it efficiently. That is what a better constitution may just do for Kenya. Remember, Kenya are now more assertive than ever, and they know their rights. They will demand accountability, fairness and equity...and they will get it.

Ken said...

@Anon 11:02 AM

I agree with your way of reasoning but we should ask ourselves, what have we done with the existing constitution?

My view is the current one is 80% effective, but what have we done with the 80%?

We should just patch up the 20% for now and move on. We should only come up with a new one when we have corrected our flaws which have stopped as from effectively using the existing 80% goodness like IMPUNITY.

Do not for a moment be lied to that the constitution those people are working on is for your benefit. These are people who are making a constitution for them and that's why you see the main area of contention is the powers and prime minister nonsense.

Honestly speaking, how do you justify the electorate electing someone who does not have the executive authority then the one with the executive authority being selected by a bunch of good for nothing MP's? If the PM will have the executive authority, then he should be elected by the people then they can select their ceremonial president and vice versa.

Anonymous said...

Lucas I agree and you are spot on. The present katiba has been mutilated and trashed NOT. All the emperors do is to do as they wish as they tramp on the very law they took oath to respect and protect.

We are not devils because of lack of preachers - we have plenty. If only evangelism could be a value. But again you are religiously preaching to a choir.

Kenyans are holding onto that ellusive hope that the lords of impunity will be punished with the new katiba now that they have soiled the old one. Will they?

Anonymous said...

The outgoing constitution gives too much sweeping powers to the president who is expected to use them for the good of the nation. But when you get a president who does not have the good of the nation in his heart, then he uses the same laws to enrich himself and his cronies, and at the same time immunize himself from prosecution or impeachment. Kenyans have seen this and that is why now we want a law which gives no room for "good faith". The president will have boundaries within which to operate. I don't understand when you say the PM will be elected by "good for nothing MPs." One, you are the one who elects the MPs so if they are good for nothing, then that also says something about you the elector. Two, MPs are representatives of the people and so if they elect someone, then technically, it is the people who have chosen him/her. Thirdly, the PM will be the leader of the party with the most number of MPs. This indirectly shows that the PM is elected by the common man who decides that he will get the most number of MPs from a certain party. Please do not look at the present parliament, PM, president. Look at it 30 years down the line when the system will have been refined and defined... and you will like it this way.

Ken said...

The root cause of 2007 is unaddressed land issues and past injustices (NOT rigged elections as some would want us to believe).

The 2005 referendum was the platform with which people were poisoned to turn against one another and against certain communities.

There had always been cracks in Kenya but it become a rift in 2005 during and after the referendum.

Given that the country is still so much polarized, and the chief perpetrators of 2007 GENOCIDE have still not been punished, and the past injustices have not yet been addressed, is this THE RIGHT TIME to start asking Kenyans to have another referendum, for a constitution the majority don't even understand?

Trust me it will end up been a PNU / ODM thing all over again.

Anonymous said...

Ah, the chicken or the egg.
The problem with this post is that it does not provide us suggestions and options for developing the values, moral codes and ethics that it's ranting about. That big gap places it in the same class as Taabu's rantings.....identifies a problem but offers no way out. Touche!

Anonymous said...

Anon 11/17/09 12:38 PM

Nobody is obliged to be a judge and jury here, you agree with the piece but seem to demand solutions from others without putting forth any of your own. Why don’t you open up a civil debate and dialogue like an intelligent chap you seem to be, to acknowledge a good thing is never a weakness? Let’s try and complement each other and debate this issue without upmanship. We are all looking for the same thing. A well governed peaceful Kenya where all can feel at home whichever part of the country you choose to live.

Anonymous said...

Kifaransa ya madirishani ... LOL

Mwarang'ethe said...

Well, the bad news is that, the root cause of Kenyan's miseries, corruption and all that are comfortably sitted in the draft. Those who understand and benefit from these things are laughing.

Sample this:

s. 270 (1) read with s. 269 (1) requires the CBK to:

(a) Promote and maintain stability of of the value of the currency.

(b) issue notes and coins.

We say, IMPOSSIBLE, IMPOSSIBLE. The laws of money do not allow this, and if one disputes, let him give us an example of a central has done this in the last 100 years.

Even interestingly, s.253 gives the national government and devolved ones to BORROW.

Here this. The English Government run a nation without incurring a single coin of debt between 1066 - 1694.

Yes, for almost 700 hundred years without debt and we are told that, a govt. in the 21st Century must borrow its own money? Are we this daft?

Oh, homo sapien has become homo mechanicus for schools destroy knowledge.

On land, s. 77 sadly, it is concerned with EQUALITY OF FORTUNES. It has never worked. It never worked with Tiberius Gracchus of Roman Empire. In fact, it brought chaos and his own death. It has also not worked in Zimbambwe.

We say, it is not equality of fortune that we seek, it is the EQUALITY OF RIGHTS that should have been the concern of land question.

There is too much bubbling about land that is not unclear and ambigous in this section. The quesion of land is a very straight forward case.

It is very simple to have declared this:

(a) Every Kenyan has right to an EQUAL share of the soil/land/natural resources in its original state. This is a maxim of natural law.

(b) It is equally a maxim of NATURAL LAW that,by whose LABOUR any portion of the soil has been rendered more fertile, has a right to the additional produce of that fertility or the value thereof.

(c) On the FIRST maxim, depends the FREEDOM and PROSPERITY of the common people. On the SECOND, depends the perfection/improvement of the common stock and wealth of a community/nation.

Thereafter, the draft could have declared:

(a) LAND VALUE TAX shall be the main source of revenue for running the affairs of the state.

It could have gone even gone further and provided that:

(a) there shall be no taxation of INCOME, WAGES, CAPITAL, CONSUMPTION etc untill the WHOLE land tax has been collected.

For instance, land value at Thika road would be taxed before Wanjiku's income and meagre consumption is touched.

Since this value has/is/been added by All, we would take it back and fund the state and since no single person has added that value, no one would lose anything. Thats the most fair tax and declaring it so in a constitution is the best gift to humanity.

Furthermore, with less taxation, employers would take more employees and reduce unemployment and poverty.

In a nutshell, thats the way to organise a state and also, the PHILOSOPHY OF WEALTH.

Is anyone listening? If not, we say this: very sadly, the nation has not recognised the CAUSE of its tribulations and therefore, it has once again, entrenched the same CAUSES in a new constitution. Kenyans will gnash their teeth in vain.

Ken said...

This Mwarang'ethe guy has some sense in his head. Good analysis, this is the kind of discussion we expect.

Anonymous said...

Ngunyi best turncoat of our times

By LAWRENCE CHITERI AND SYLVESTER OLUOCH
Published November 16, 2009

How would a small and physically insignificant character, burn a huge, and massive figure in the guise of cobbling his shoes? This is the relationship between the political class, and the masses in Kenya, where constitution making is concerned. There is no personal vibe against Mutahi Ngunyi. In fact, this is a political analyst, whose articles tore into the political field, with unrivalled precision, years back. The cancer in our culture is that, when a brewer knows their clout, they dilute the liquor.

Politicians know how certain columnists affect readership, and the numbers that come with it. Therefore it is predictable that they would, and usually do, purchase the pen and pad off the hands of independent persons, to scribe in their direction. Lately, there is this suspicion that Ngunyi is fronting a course, and it is clear as crystal whose cause it is. The parallel by Ngunyi, about fish and the monkey, used to illustrate the Kenyan situation, is very unfortunate. The fish he mentions was actually in its natural habitat, which insinuates that the struggles of Kenyans are natural to them, and should be perpetuated.

Ngunyi, like every Kenyan is free to vote, however he pleases, but what does he want to vote for at this point in time? The draft, which is merely a proposal, has yet to go to Parliament, be amended and then be subjected to a referendum. Yet Ngunyi has already voted! Honestly, nobody knows what the draft proposal will look like, after it comes from Parliament, leave alone vote for it. Harping on the Kofi Annan formula is to forget that it was only a stop-gap measure. If, as Ngunyi suggests, this model is adopted, we would effectively have killed multiparty political gains; watch out, all major parties, are now in government! If the 222 Members of Parliament are hungry, what would Ngunyi say of the 30 million plus Kenyans? All parties buy votes, only that the MPs vote purchase price is higher than the 30 million’s he naively dismisses.

One day, hare wanting to stamp his witty superiority against the power of might, used elephant’s dire desire to have shoes, to kill him. Hare convinced elephant that the shoes could only be cobbled, by his feet being heated, under direct fire. While this process went on, elephant would lament, but each time hare referred to his size, and cowardice, to intimidate him to compliance. Not wanting to degrade himself, elephant bore the pain to death. Now, because the wider majority of Kenyans badly want a constitution, the witty class of politicians wants to cobble one to their death.

There are many urgent and immediate needs in Kenya, around which a constitution would revolve, yet nobody discusses them. The constitution has been reduced to power sharing and power retention instead. First, Orange Democratic Movement (ODM), was a product of conglomerating opportunistic gang of people, clamouring for leadership. Party of National Unity (PNU), for its part, is a patchwork of fringe political stations, hankering for droppings from the table of power, for their cowardly failure to individually stab at that power. Come another referendum, a new political consortium will be born. These vehicles of thirst for power should not be the points of reference in our constitution making.

Anonymous said...

CONTINUED

Mama Charity Ngilu aptly put it; if Kenyans are going to wait for politicians to deliver a constitution, they have a long time to do so. Other stakeholders must come up now, and make their stakes known. The direction things are taking, shows these politicians, want to tailor-make a constitution, that will guarantee their political interests in 2012 and beyond.

From simple lessons in civics, it is known that Parliament is the law making body in Kenya. This organ is a symbol of representative democracy, and which is the source of its supremacy. MPs have made laws that govern this country since independence, and never have they been accused of parliamentary dictatorship. The voting pattern in Kenya has been such that, the presidency, comes with majority MPs. Kenyans tend to vote in the touted “three piece.” If things remain as they are, the President and the Prime Minister would both come from the same party? How does this happen? Because the party with the majority of MPs, provides the Prime Minister.

If elections were not stolen in 2007, ODM was going to give Kenyans a President and Prime Minister. Ngunyi certainly knows this. The arrangement in parliament today, is a default arrangement to cement feelings. This can not be the basis upon which to derive a hypothesis. Perhaps some people are already drawing from this precedent, and want to perpetuate it. There will not, and should not, be another rigged election in Kenya. What is this thing about “PNU communities have the numbers, but no seats,” while ODM, “the the seats but no numbers”? Ngunyi implies that PNU won the elections, with the obviously inflated numbers. Who are the PNU and ODM communities anyway?

Kenya does not need an imperial presidency, that power has been too raw to help resist wanton dictatorship, and hero-worship mentality. Kenya needs leaders, not rulers, and power must be refined, redefined and devolved. The more avenues for that sharing the better, the glamour of voting patterns will take their shape, when the constitution is amended and passed. Kenyans will find their level; let them not be hoodwinked into thinking that the transfer of their voice, will be done by a clique. That clique will be their voice by representation.

That is what representative democracy is all about, or what does it mean? After all, the President in Kenya, is a member of parliament like others; the difference is that, he is popularized in other constituencies, by fellow prospective, and eventual MPs, that popularization already makes him indebted to the said MPs, not vice versa. Therefore, if the President needs the MPs, to get people to vote for him, does it not follow that, the people entrust their representatives, to vote on their behalf on issues, including the premiership? When did this become parliamentary dictatorship? The President is an ordinary member of parliament first!

Lastly Ngunyi knows that the referendum in 2005, did not plant the seeds of destruction; this seed was planted at independence. That is when the privileged class, made efforts to systematically disenfranchise the majority. The year 2005 was the beginning of the era of overwhelming civil consciousness, which the bungled elections ignited, into the fire that consumed Kenya. Let us have opinions, but not customize our own facts. Even devolution or majimbo, have been misunderstood, whenever the rich become jittery of something, be it known; it is good for the common man. The popularity of Constituency Development Funds (CDF), is a successful experimentation with majimbo! Ask Kenyans, and they will glorify CDF; it is the greed and thirst for more that will kill Kenya, not majimbo.

Anonymous said...

Come on Ken, you don't open your post-molars cheering with LITTLE input claiming higher pedestal of debate quality. Yours is nothing but running on empty packaged as loaded opinions.

Kenyans can run round circles all they care while avoiding the reality staring them in the face. No amount of evangelism as anon above aptly puts it will extricate you from the hell hole.

The rulers you have had since uhuru are the real devils. You can wax patriotic or even pretend to be intellectuall all you want but you are headed nowhere until you confront the stinking rot before you.

Talk remains cheap, ama?

Ken said...

@Taabu, my input may be little but I acknowledge good contributions and don't engage in tribal bashing and sycophancy like some people who I will not name.

I believe it is better just to acknowledge the contributions of others if you don't feel you are in a position to put forward a solid argument at that moment than to just criticize others en engage in verbal diarrhea.

Anonymous said...

Please Taabu, stop watering down this otherwise interesting discussion with your personalized attacks. Are you jealous that that this first-timers post has received accolades when your hundred ones have received scathing?

Kumekucha, many websites and blogs are being opened to enable Kenyans discuss the draft constitution that has just been released and given to Kenyans to interrogate it for the next 30 days. Every Kenyan's mind and brain is now focused on the draft because chances are that this time it will go thro'. If you allow people like Taabu to distract, deride, derail, demean us, we will gladly and quickly jump ship. I suggest that for next one month, let guest speakers give their pieces on the draft constitution. Ban Taabu from saying anything...and watch how your readership will grow in leaps and bounds.

Anonymous said...

Something is bugging me. A lot is being said about the powers of president, PM, parliament being either increased, decreased or checked. But what about the judiciary? It is the third arm of the govt!! It needs to be strengthened, given more independence and powers and expanded. In the event that the president, PM and speaker are all in the same party, they will form a cabal, syndicate and dictatorship which only an independent and powerful judiciary will be able to check. I suggest that the chief justice be elected by the LSK, human rights bodies, NGO council and other relevant stakeholders. The president or PM should have no say in the appointment of the chief justice, the judges and the magistrates. They should all enjoy security of tenure and be removed only when seen to be grossly incompetent and/or partisan.
Look at it this way: There are 3 arms of Govt; judiciary, executive and legislature. The heads of executive and legislature are elected into office, yet the one of judiciary is appointed. Why? He/she should also be elected, so that his/her allegiance can be to those who elected him, not the one person who appointed him/her.

Lebo

Anonymous said...

Anon @ 1:26 pm.
What the heck is biting your backside? I see no problem in asking the writer of the piece to take his argument to its logical conclusion i.e. if what is necessary are values and norms (and not a new rules/constitution), then how then can those necessary values and norms be created?

And you are mistaken--I neither agree nor disagree with his piece. But I actually do think that laws (if enforced anyonymously, fairly and in a timely fashion) can be the basis for creating new norms and values.

So stop your idiotic lecture.

Mwarang'ethe said...

We would appreciate vigourous debate, critism, improvements but no abuse of this proposal.

We are still framing the whole proposal on how to link LAND, TAX and MONEY creation by the State(although we are constrained due to lack of time).

In s.253 (1) it is provided that the national government may borrow from any source. Also, s.254 (1) gives the devolved government powers to borrow money.

This is the conventional wisdom of DEBT based money system. However, we know that a nation that borrows its money (medium of exchange) with interest can never get out of debt.

In simple terms, this system produces debt slavery. In fact, as time goes by, the interest payment will become unbearable as we see in the world economy today.

The end result is inflation or even destruction of a nation. It is useful to mention that, the existence of inflation is due to use of non bona fide media of exchange.

Thus, by requiring the CBK to issue money, we have given it back the powers it had before to issue inflationary medium of exchange. If it did not provide stable medium of exchange before, it will not even this time. So, there is need for change.

Let us be clear. There is no difference between inflationary medium of exchange and the counterfeit medium of exchange. Thus, the medium of exchange issued or to be issued by the CBK will not be a bona fide medium of exchange.

How The Kenyan Government May issue
Tax Credit Certificates as Bona Fide Medium of Exchange:

We advocate for CREDIT based money system. Let us illustrate how it may work.

Let us assume the Kenyan Government employs 2 million people. These people render useful services in health, education, defence, police, justice etc.

At the end of the month, these workers should be paid with a tax credit certificate in the amount earned by the employee. If X earned KES 100, the tax credit certificate signed by relevant official would be written as follows:

“This certificate will be redeemed for one hundred Kenyan shillings in the payment of Kenyan Government taxes.”

However, before the Kenyan Government can issue such certificates, it MUST pass a NON – REVOCABLE TAX ASSESSMENT on the taxable property, in our case LAND (including airwaves, landing slots) which must be equal to the amount of tax credits to be issued. This is obvious because even if it goes to the bank, it can only pay with taxes collected.

Also, let us bear in mind that, provision of infrastructure by the government like roads increase the value of land as we have seen on Thika road and Lamu recently.

Thus, to increase the value of land, the government will have to invest in infrastructure. This seems to us, an incentive for the government to provide world class infrastructure around the nation and there4. increase the efficiency of the economy.

By doing so, the Kenyan Government need not incur DOMESTIC DEBTS with interest/usury from so called banks to pay its employees or any of its supplies it acquires from the market.

Since the Government will receive the certificate at its face value, other people will also receive it at its face value.

Such a certificate are bona fide media of exchange, and can therefore serve as payment for purchase of goods and services including payment of taxes.

We repeat, under the current system, to have medium of exchange, it must be BORROWED and the resultant USURY must be paid from TAXES. This raises tax levels for the poor people to pay for money that the Govt. could have created without debt as explained above.

The devolved Government can also issue medium of exchange in the same manner and therefore, avoid totally incurring so called DOMESTIC DEBT.

As we noted, let us have comments on this proposal.

Mwarang'ethe said...

Money Creation by Private Sector

If all levels of government issued money as we noted above, there should be enough media of exchange in circulation for all other purposes.

However, if not, then, private corporations should issue their CERTIFICATES OF CREDIT for the sale of all the WANTED goods/services that are produced.

Wanted goods are those that people are willing to work for or those they are willing to exchange with other goods or services. Just like the government cannot issue more than it is going to get from land tax, the, private corporations can only issue to the extent of the goods/services they are OFFERING for sale.

This means that, as production increases, the amount of medium of exchange will increase and if production decreases, then, the amount of media of exchange decreases as well.

This will produce a medium of exchange with a relatively STABLE BUYING POWER.

Thus, we see how to scientifically attain a stable currency is not by allowing CBK the monopoly of producing money when it produces nothing and does not have the minute knowledge of how much production we have as the private sector.

The best way to create bona fide money is to use the credit based monetary system.

HOW WOULD IT WORK?

Briefly, this is how a company like National Oil Corporation of Kenya (NOCK), Safaricom, Uchumi, KPLC etc can create their own bona fide money that cannot be inflationary because it will be matched with their goods and services.

When NOCK wants to pay its employees or its suppliers, it gets credit from banks. This credit must be repaid with interest. For instance one would like to know how much it borrows and pays to pay its employees.

Instead of "borrowing" money, actually credit, from Equity bank etc, NOCK to start with, can ask the employee, how much do you spend on car fuel per month on average?

Let us assume you say, 50, 000 KES. If that is the case, all that NOCK needs to do is issue you with a self printed CERTIFICATE OF CREDIT (IOU) for KES 50, 000 in different denominations that is REDEEMABLE at NOCK’s petrol stations.

Unlike bank credit which is:

(a) not evidence of a just claim for goods/services,

(b) is not earned by anyone,

(c) is loaned into circulation,

(d) which creates perpetual debts,

(e) which creates inflation if loaned too much, and deflation when they loan very little,

the NOCK’s CC will be evidence of REAL CREDIT as opposed to make believe as well as a BONA FIDE MEDIUM OF EXCHANGE because:

(a)Is evidence of a just claim for the goods and services because the issuer (NOCK) shall redeem it,

(b)Is not loaned into circulation by paid or sold into circulation,

(c)It is earned by the employee or anyone who supplied to NOCK.

In simple terms, a bona fide medium of exchange should be always be issued by the possessor of goods and services with the document as evidence of the claim for those goods and services.

So, the question is, what will you do with this CC? Simple, whenever you want to fuel your cars, you drive to any NOCK petrol station and give them one of the notes and they you fill your tank. We do not earn money to eat it. We use it to buy diesel and other stuff. Isn’t it?

Or, if you go into Uchumi, and pick a few items, instead of handing over a note with a head of a petty tyrant, you give the cashier the CC.

But, why should a cashier at Uchumi accept a NOCK’s CC? Simple, Uchumi has cars that need to be fuelled, and all they need to do is drive and fuel in NOCK’s petrol station. Or, since their employees drives cars as well, they can be paid using NOCK’s CC and they use them to fuel their cars.

To make it more acceptable, just have the CC insured by a reputable insurance company.

The premium payable will be less than the interest paid to the banks. And, you can also have it that, if presented after three months, you can get cash because the products you would have produced with your labour who have been sold for normal cash.

Any comments and criticisms?

Philip said...

Let's go back to history, if we had a better constitution was Kenyatta going to mis-use his powers? Was Moi going to misuse his powers? Was Kibaki going to misuse his powers?

There are things we do right not because we want to do right but because we fear the law in place and punishments following it. That's why there have been laws to guide us since the time of God and the Israelites. Even if we don't follow these laws it doesn't nullify their existence and it doesn't mean they are useless.

Sometimes it's good to start with a good basis than not have any basis at all in order to guide us. The only thing I'm against the constitution is having an executive PM elected by MPs and not us, however this doesn't mean that I don't want an improvement of the current constitution.

It is so encouraging to see high ranking government official going scot-free for his wrongdoings if we also want to engage in the same vice. Kenyatta, Moi, Kibaki and the people surrounding them went scot-free and that has had a chain reaction to people below them upto even a messenger in government institution - and what made them go scot-free? It's the loopholes in the current constitution.

Some of these loopholes are like the independence of judiciary from executive which doesn't exist in the current constitution, so that people like Chief Justice and Attorney General have become the puppets of the president, and so as long as one is closer to the president or one is closer to the Minister who in turn is closer to the president, or as long as one is closer to the PA of the President who definately is closer to the President e.t.c one engages in wrongdoings knowing very well that he won't be touched. And others, noticing this, also follow suit, and that's how bad morals in our society have been effected and are higher in government institutions. We know what Fidel did with maize, one motivation was that he'll get protection from the Dad.

Our morals need control and one better way to control it is setting up laws. In case of any discovery of loophole it needs to be sealed so that people don't mis-use it, and that's why we need an improvement of the current constitution.

Lucas Mboya said...

ladies and gentlemen. I appreciate all the comments on this post. There is so much to do to fix our country and so little time. most of all i know that all those who have commented have a genuine desire to see this country goes the right way and thats what counts. In particular i agree with a criticism leveled at me (and others) that we are experts at pointing out the problems and offering no solutions. Point taken. I thought about this alot overnight. how do we develop values in the first place. Let me try and take up that issue. I have had the privilege of visiting every district in kenya. I will use an urbanized luo as an example. He will live in Nairobi. Visit his upcountry occasionally, or kisumu and once a year take his kids to the Coast. If he can afford to he will visit London or the US and consider himself traveled. Yet he will not over a weekend even drive 1 and a half hours to Nyeri, Or machakos, or namanga, or Baringo. see the rub? so he is limited in how he perceives his country and other communities. And lets face it. Most of us are the same. Kenyans are very poorly traveled in their own country. To develop a value system we need to see how others live, their cultures, habits, traditions ethics and morals all rub off on us. This is how we develop values and morality. By interacting with each other. This is how we de mystify tribalism and ethnicity. This is how we foster nationhood. It takes effort. So there must be a conscious effort to change our values. It does not come by chance and this forum is an ideal place for that to start. One thing I can say about Americans though i find them obnoxious farts, is that they have a sense of patriotism that is startling. another thing you will find about americans is they travel widely in their own country. In fact many of them see America as the whole world. hence many of their sporting events they call world series or world championships though only teams/clubs in america take part. I know i have not dealt with all that has been raised but i have offered a way forward. Get to know those parts and peoples of kenya that you dont. You will be suprised how much of a difference it makes to your/my outlook on the events taking place in the socio political arena.

Mwarang'ethe said...

Lucas Mboya wrote:

To develop a value system we need
to see how others live, their cultures, habits, traditions ethics and morals all rub off on us. This is how we develop values and morality. By interacting with each other. This is how we de mystify tribalism and ethnicity. This is how we foster nationhood. It takes effort. So there must be a conscious effort to change our values. It does not come by chance

Our response:

One leading philosopher at the University of Aberdeen, who was a contemporary of Adam Smith wrote the following about land question:

"All these untoward circumstances which take place ... may be traced up, as to THEIR CAUSE, to that EXCLUSIVE RIGHT to the IMPROVABLE value of soil which a few men, never in any country exceeding one hundreth part of the community, are permitted to engross - a most oppressive privilege, by the operation of which the HAPPINESS of mankind has been for ages more invaded and restrained, than by all the tyranny of kings, the imposture of priests, and the CHICANE OF LAWYERS taken together, though these are supposed to be the greatest evils that afflict the societies of human kind.

The silent but pervading energy of this oppression comes home to the bosoms and to the firesides of the LOWEST ORDERS OF MEN, who are thereby rendered MEAN - SPIRITED and SERVILE. It begets in them also, for their own defence, so much CUNNING, FRAUD, HYPOCRISY and MALIGNANT ENVY towards those who enjoy affluence, that by its wide and continual operation the virtue of mankind is MORE CORRUPTED, and their minds mode debased..."

Very unfortunate, the establishment decided to boycott this professor's writings while parroting Adam Smith's.

They did this cos they wanted to retain their privileges and power while deceiving the masses that we have a free market system.

By not allowing the philosophers, lawyers, economists, sociologists, etc to learn about this work and that of Adam Smith, they labour in vain blaming free market for the ills we see.

Simply, we never had free market system for the knowledge that would have allowed it operate was suppressed.

When u add this land monopoly and money monopoly, we have a mixture that produces the evils we wail about. Thus, to develop a better value system, these monopolies and privileges must be destroyed.

Anonymous said...

@Mwarang'ethe, as I have pointed out in my few commments, I am great enthusiast of your political and social ideology. I am personally a proponent of a social-democratic form of governance. The only problem with this is that it's almost too ideal!!! Well, on this whole land thing, we need to agree that "land is not a product of human labour, and as such, no one person should claim legal title to it" ......food for thought!!!!!

Mwarang'ethe said...

Anonymous said...
@Mwarang'ethe, as I have pointed out in my few commments, I am great enthusiast of your political and social ideology. I am personally a proponent of a social-democratic form of governance. The only problem with this is that it's almost too ideal!!!

Our comments:

What is so ideal?

Is it requiring the Govt. to collect land values we generate collectively? Just study Lamu port and Thika road and u shall be forced to see the practicality of these ideas.

Surely if Frederick the Great of Prussia could tax land those days, why not us in the 21st Century?

If the Babylonian Kingdom build its empire based on land tax, why not us in the 21st Century?

If England Govt. used what we propose btw. 1066 and 1694, how can it ideal in the 21st Century?

As concerns private money, when Friedrich List more than a century ago constructed Leipsig - Dresden Railway, he was authorised to issue 500, 000 thaler.

This money formed one third of the co. capital in the form of "railway money certificates, subject to the provision that no obligation would rise therefrom to the State."

U call what has been done by ancient men ideal for 21st Century?

Remember what we said, schools DESTROY KNOWLEDGE and BRAINWASH. How many people know about these examples we are offering here?

Schools should have exposed people to all these ideas. This would allow people to see what is possible, and what has worked before and why, and more importantly, why was it abandoned.

Instead, they BRAINWASH people to glorify slavery and serfdom while calling it freedom and free markets.

Mwarang'ethe said...

Anonymous said...
@Mwarang'ethe, as I have pointed out in my few commments, I am great enthusiast of your political and social ideology. I am personally a proponent of a social-democratic form of governance. The only problem with this is that it's almost too ideal!!!

Our comments:

Let us add this.

If we do not get LAND and MONEY question correct, we can forget everything else for all those stuff they call Human Right and those kind of jazz etc, are all dependent on these two institutions.

As an engineer will tell you, if you miss the foundation of a building, it does not matter how you try to make the roof look beautiful. Or, as Jesus said, having a foundation of sand will bring you nothing but ruin.

What we are offering Kenyans, is not just on how to construct any state. We are offering what we believe will be the finest example to the rest of suffering humanity including the Americans who are drowning in debts, repossession of houses and such.

Anonymous said...

Your post makes sense but let us not forget that values are built and they are not imposed and enacted. Our founding fathers are the ones who would have shown us the way - but what did they do? They threw values out of the window. Tom Mboya cannibalised the constituton of Kanu to put Jaramogi out of action. Kenyatta then killed Mboya to get him out of the way - this continued until Moi put a seal on it and it became part of our life. A new constituton might therefore be the starting point to bring our values back.

Anonymous said...

@Mwarang'ethe, I am anonymous @3:34. What I indeed meant, is that I am in total agreement with your sentiments and I would seek us to address the very fundamental reason why we are a "failing" state. By too ideal, I meant "too ideal for the political class to even think about".....it's in their absolute interest that the status quo remains so that they can continue owning/controlling capital and the means of production......

Mwarang'ethe said...

By too ideal, I meant "too ideal for the political class to even think about".....it's in their absolute interest that the status quo remains so that they can continue owning/controlling capital and the means of production......

Our response:

We have had two types of powers throughout the mankind's history. These are:

(a) political power, and
(b) civil power.

When political power is dominant as we see today, civil power is less and there is stagnation. Reverse the equation and u will see peace and prosperity for all.

The issue is this, you are reading this, and many other Kenyans, what will you do with this information? That is the choice before you, and every reader of this blog.

Now, just imagine this. If we assessed the land values in Kenya today, and realised that, we could tax just KES 50 billion and thereby, reduce the tax burden on income and consumption by this amount, what would Kenyans do with extra KES 50 B in their pockets?

By taxing land, waste etc, we would be leaving those who create wealth with more more money in their pockets.

Consequently, Kenyans would be able to afford schools, health, houses and put investments in agri/industry in a scale never seen before. Is this not what every typical Kenyan want?

By freeing them from this naked robbery, we would give them free choice, which free markets are supposed to provide, but, have not done due to monopolies we have talked about. Consequently, only the rich enjoy choice while the rest are told, funga mshipi for we have "recession."

And, since we lack free markets, we construct bloated so called wellfare governments/socialist govt. trying to do everything while getting everything wrong.

How pathetic? Isn't this what you see today in UK and USA where govt. which are addicted to debt are becoming the biggest employers of paper pushers? Some of these are employed to calculate "public debts" and inflation and they think they are productive without knowing they are just wasted labour intercepting wealth. Very sad state of affairs.

The whole point is, reclaim your civil power and crush the political power. Will you?

Anonymous said...

@Mwarang'ethe,

I agree with you on taxing wasted land i.e. land that is not productive. But I disagree with taxing productive land, its just another tax levied at the investor. As to money, your idea might be right but where in the world has this approach adopt and has worked. I don't find it practical or feasible.

Mwarang'ethe said...

Anonymous said...
@Mwarang'ethe,

I agree with you on taxing wasted land i.e. land that is not productive. But I disagree with taxing productive land, its just another tax levied at the investor.

Our response:

U forget one fundamental fact.
All income above that necessary to sustain labor will accrue to the OWNERS OF LAND without their EXPENDITURE of their LABOR.

Thus, the value of land is not added by the investor. We have given you the example of Lamu port and Thika road.

Which investor has invested a single cent there to raise the values? It is the taxpayer who has invested or will invest her taxes. Therefore, when u tax these raised valued, you take them back to the funders of the projects. That is simple justice and equity. Why are obvious stuff so difficult to accept? Open up your mind.

Thus, you are proposing we leave unearned income with a few people. Why?

If you leave some people with unearned income, you have entrenched inequality in law that can never be rectified by any subsequent actions you take. For we shall ask, what about those who do not have land at Lamu and have paid tax to build the port?

It is either you want equality in law, or you do not want it. Period.

As a matter of fact, leaving a few people to enjoy unearned income, does violence to the Biblical economic law that man shall eat from the sweat of his brow. Once you violate this natural law, all is destroyed. It is that serious and fundamental you get this right.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

As to money, your idea might be right but where in the world has this approach adopt and has worked. I don't find it practical or feasible.

Our response:

We have give you examples from England to Germany. What else do you want?

In any case, can you show us how assessing land values and thereby printing tax credit certificate to that amount is impractical?

Secondly, where is the present monetary system we have working? Is it in America where millions are in poverty? Is it in the UK where millions are in poverty?

For instance, now that banks have gone on "strike" the businesses have no money to do business. Under our proposal, the banks can go on strike, but, business shall go on. Otherwise, we are under terrible monopoly held by a few. Open up you mind and see the possibilities.

Anonymous said...

Mwarangethe's ideas are novel. Novel in that I don't think they have been successfully tried anywhere else. So, they seem very mystified. How do we move from a cash to a credit based system? To convince Kenyans that this will work is very difficult and that is why Mwarangethe has posed before "Do we have a Plato or Socrates nowadays?" It will take the charisma of Obama and the courage of Castro, Che etc and the intellect of Socrates to move Africa from the doldrums of poverty to prosperity but it can be done. So Mwarangethe you might just be having the ideas needed to move us to the promised land but I see them going nowhere unless we can debate this thing at the national level in Kenya.

Mwarangethe:
1. Does it mean everyone will be free to issue Irrevocable letters of credit? In what units? i.e do you not see a problem when dealing with people who don't fall in the class of people who can fuel using NOCK etc. What about savings and the value of the CCs. Maybe I still don't get it?
2. How do we deal with foreign trade? They don't honor CC's or do we now revert to the use of Gold as the standard FX currency?

Mwarang'ethe said...

As to money, your idea might be right but where in the world has this approach adopt and has worked. I don't find it practical or feasible.

Our comment:

Just to make matter more clearer. When we had gold standard, you would go to the Govt. mint in the USA, deposit your gold, and they issue you with a certificate. This certificate functioned as a medium of exchange.

This is the same way paper money started with goldsmith storing gold while issuing owners with a certificate. Unfortunately, gold money is also monopoly money.

The backing of that certificate was that gold. U would take it knowing that when u went to the mint, u could redeem the gold.

Likewise, the backing of credit certificate issued by Kenya Railways will be backed by its transport services. U take it knowing that, if u are travelling to Mombasa, they will redeem it. Money is so simple but very few understand it.

So, it will be money backed mathematically by WEALTH which is the backer of all money.

And, if you wanna see this matter well, just look at Zimbambwe in the recent years. Since the creators of wealth stopped creating wealth (money is not wealth) the more money Mugabe printed, the weaker the currency became.

We think Zimbambwe case was a nice example for those who are alert to understand the meaning of money and how sound money may be issued. The Zimbambean central bank could issue all the money it wanted, but, could not back it up. And, since money is a CLAIM on wealth, this paper found no wealth to claim.

Unfortunately, very few are alert so such social facts and their meaning to our economic system.

Anonymous said...

Mwarangethe,
Your ideas look logical, even workable, but they are many light years ahead of Wanjiku who must look at the draft constitution, understand it and critique it within the next 30 days.How many Wanjikus can understand what you are saying? Why don't we discuss basic ideas and concepts which appeal to Wanjiku without compromising the principles? For instance, how will localizing services affect the common man? Has Wanjiku understood substituting PCs with Governors will change her life for the better in any significant way? Will the Luhya teacher in Meru still be guaranteed of his job, or will he be told to go to his jimbo? How is the draft addressing homosexuality, same sex marriage, freedom of worship, land acquisition and inheritance,taxation, health, education, elections etc. These are the things that we need to talk about clearly and in a practical way. Philosophies of akina Socrates will be understood by Wanjiku when she is at least assured of a meal tomorrow, feels secure, knows that there will be no fighting in the 2012 elections, and that she is seen as Kenyan by all, not by her name, accent or sex.

Lebo

Mwarang'ethe said...

Mwarangethe:
1. Does it mean everyone will be free to issue Irrevocable letters of credit? In what units? i.e do you not see a problem when dealing with people who don't fall in the class of people who can fuel using NOCK etc. What about savings and the value of the CCs. Maybe I still don't get it?
2. How do we deal with foreign trade? They don't honor CC's or do we now revert to the use of Gold as the standard FX currency?

Our response:

Well, not every one will be able to issue credit certificates. It is those who create wealth will be able to do that.

However, let us state this. There has to be a NATIONAL CURRENCY COMMISSION or whatever you call it to regulate these matters.

It will be the responsibility of this commission to bring forth law and regulations as to how Kenya Railway may issue money for instance.

So, this Commission will deal with questions of units, conversion of such certificates with Govt. issued money/CC and related matters.

As concerns foreign trade, there will be a number of ways of seeing the matter.

For instance, if we limit our credit certificates to the value of land tax value, we shall be having the most stable currency in the world. The fact that we call it CC, does not detract from the point that, it will be our currency just like the Kenyan currency we have now.

Every investor is looking for a stable currency. We would provide them with that. This national currency/CC will also have its exchange rate with the rest of the currencies just as we have now. It is only that, it will be strong and very stable currency and there4. very attractive.

Well, as concerns NOCK and those who do not have cars, you need to see the issues from this perspective.

We need money BACKED by REAL WEALTH and not inflation creating money from CBK and its agents, i.e bankers.

Even if you have no car, you will take the CC from NOCK because there will be so many people who will be willing to take it for they have cars. Or, you can convert it in the bank to the National CC or any other CC may be from KPLC for paying your electricity bill or safaricom CC for your phone bill.

U also need to appreciate that by having devolved currency only accepted in various regions, we shall be able to create stable local economies since this money will not flow to the City bankers to fund MNCs that undermine small businesses which they do not fund. There are so many issues involved in what we are proposing.

As we noted, study the Zimbambwe case and u will see that any currency is backed by wealth creators and when they stop creating wealth (money is not wealth, it is a claim on wealth), the currency collapses.

So, if they produce wealth to back it up, why do they have to borrow from a monopolies who create nothing?

Mwarang'ethe said...

Lebo wrote

How is the draft addressing homosexuality, same sex marriage, freedom of worship, land acquisition and inheritance,taxation, health, education, elections etc.

Our response

By addressing the issue we are yapping about, u shall have addressed land acquisition, taxation and their ability to afford health, education for themselves and their kids.

You ignore these issues, and you shall solve nothing for Wanjiku will be taxed to build Thika road, Lamu port and thereby raise the value of adjacent land, and a few Kenyans and foreigners will pocket this value. This is inequality in law and Wanjiku shall be not equal to the rich and wealthy who own land.

You ignore money question, the Government will continue issuing inflation inducing money and thereby destroy the purchasing power of Wanjiku.

To make it worse, the bankers will continue issuing credit to finance speculation and gambling by the few rich instead of funding productive sectors of the economy where Wanjiku will look for a job.

Anonymous said...

Mwarangethe,

I disagree with you the land tax that you are proposing. For example Thika road, the main beneficiaries of that road are the users of the road not the adjacent land owners. Therefore, if we want to talk of fairness then it is interest of the nation to tax the road users.

Land prices are driven by supply/demand. Simple economics. Therefore prices will only increase for the thika road land, if demand also increases. The prospective buyers see value in the land therefore they are willing to pay for it. In the end, the investment in the road will generate more revenue for the gov't (increased investments) and create employment.

Anonymous said...

Mwarangethe, how do you propose to transition from our monetary system as is to what you are proposing? And how will people who are monied at the moment, i.e the rich be able to exchange their moneys for new CCs? Or do you propose we burn all our currencies at start afresh?

Anonymous said...

Lucas Mboya:
True, true, meaningful interaction can be one way of enhancing new value development & cross fertilization of ideas. Perhaps the education system (i.e the curriculum at different levels) can be another way?
Great that you bothered to respond!

Anonymous said...

Each time I read Mwarangethe's posts, I cant help but dissolve into fits of laughter. Honest! But then, there's this guy who likes to respond to Mwarangethe (eg the one who says mwarangethe's ideas are 'novel'-heh-heh), now that one cracks me up phenomenally. But great arguments all around.

Anonymous said...

Mwarangethe,
I think at the moment we need to prioritize issues, the issue of the perfect currency is not a priority at the moment but eventually is one we need to look into to see it's working. I think your other ideas on land and taxation should be looked into. Infact I propose we come up with a proper land policy before we even look at the money issue, I think if we looked at the controversial issues in the draft, debate what Lucas has started here i.e how to institute a values-based constitution and try to solve endemic problems that have bedeviled Kenya, once every thing is ironed out and we are moving ahead, we delve into this monetary issue. In like the next 5-10 yrs. What do you think?

Anonymous said...

Anon at 1.09 PM, you want to appear as if you are too "smart" but I am yet to read any of your suggestions. You are the kind that belittles others yet have nothing to show. I say, bring forth ideas and if you don't PLEASE! take a hike.

Mwarang'ethe said...

Anonymous said...
Mwarangethe,

I disagree with you the land tax that you are proposing. For example Thika road, the main beneficiaries of that road are the users of the road not the adjacent land owners. Therefore, if we want to talk of fairness then it is interest of the nation to tax the road users.

Our response:

Good attempt. However, you need to do more research on land question.

May be as usual, u missed this:

http://www.standardmedia.co.ke/business/InsidePage.php?id=1144025878&cid=464

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

The prospective buyers see value in the land therefore they are willing to pay for it.

Our response:

There is something called thinking through. Yes, they will see value of land, but, where does that value come from? Think thru and u will see the obvious which is escaping your mind. Can u explain to us why land in the centre of a city which is just like any land is the most expensive?

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Mwarangethe, how do you propose to transition from our monetary system as is to what you are proposing? And how will people who are monied at the moment, i.e the rich be able to exchange their moneys for new CCs? Or do you propose we burn all our currencies at start afresh?

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

You are not serious at all. First, do the "monied" have a lot of cash in their houses? U seem not to understand what it means to be rich. To be rich does not mean you have millions of notes in your house. Perhaps, u know such idiotic rich people.

Secondly, you do not expect us to provide every details of such a major reform. This is a reform that will require serious deliberation by experts in these stuff and come up with all issues u ask. Thus, ua question is irrelevant. In any case, is transition the greatest problem you see?

For instance, how did Germany transion to Euro? What a silly question? Think a little bit.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

I think at the moment we need to prioritize issues, the issue of the perfect currency is not a priority at the moment but eventually is one we need to look into to see it's working.

Our response:

U seem not to appreciate that money is the blood of the economy. If your blood is poisoned, do u say, oh, oh, lets deal with the toes first?

Fix the blood to allow proper circulation and the body is fine. If you leave the poisoned blood, the body will succumb.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Anonymous said...
Each time I read Mwarangethe's posts, I cant help but dissolve into fits of laughter. Honest!

Our response:

We used to have a mad man who was always laughing in the local market. As you would expect, he would contribute nothing, just a lot of laughter.

Anonymous said...

Ha, ha, haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa. I told you. Sooo funny.

Anonymous said...

Mwarangethe reminds me of the guy who has a hammer, and then everything looks like a nail to him. That's his contribution--banging on everything around him, nail or not, with the hammer.

Joe said...

Mwarangethe,

If we had a mechanism for determining all value addition in a given year for the purposes of issuing credit, wouldn't it be easier to issue this credit from a centralised body so that Kenya Railways, Kengen, Lamu port, The GoK etc do not each issue their own currency (credit)?

Mwarang'ethe said...

Joe said...
Mwarangethe,

If we had a mechanism for determining all value addition in a given year for the purposes of issuing credit, wouldn't it be easier to issue this credit from a centralised body so that Kenya Railways, Kengen, Lamu port, The GoK etc do not each issue their own currency (credit)?

Our response:

Good suggestion.

To the extent that, these credits will be issued on behalf of KR, NOCK, KPLC etc to avoid duplication, that would be fine.

All we are saying is, there is no point of businesses in the 21st to be destroyed by the banking monopoly which loves to put people's money in speculation and gambling.

As we noted above, at this moment, we are concerned with strategy. As concerns tactics, you suggest a viable alternative and it would be the work of the committee of experts to deal with all these issues.

Mwarang'ethe said...

Joe said...
Mwarangethe,

If we had a mechanism for determining all value addition in a given year for the purposes of issuing credit, wouldn't it be easier to issue this credit from a centralised body

Our response:

As a matter of fact, some blue prints on how this could be done in a centralised system as u suggest were prepared way back in 1940' and 50's. Thus, what you suggest is a very good idea.

In any case, although some idiots think Mwarang'ethe is mad, what we are talking about is alread being used. We have a lot of details for anyone genuinely interested in these matters.

Anonymous said...

Yes, even writes and responds to own posts.

Anonymous said...

"The writer of this post, Lucas Mboya is the son of the late Tom Mboya."

We are supposed to be impressed?

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